Can you help The Hungry Cyclist?

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thehungrycyclist
Junior Burger
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2004/12/04 08:00:44 (permalink)

Can you help The Hungry Cyclist?

Having been advised, by a fellow "Roadfooder", that my previous post might get lost in the Thanks Giving rush - here is another call to arms from The Hungry Cyclist.

In May 2005 I am heading out on an interactive, pedal powered gastronomic tour of North and South America.

I will be cycling my way around the Americas in search of the perfect meal but I NEED YOUR HELP to tell me where to look.

Local delicasies, great restaurants, food festivals, your mums cooking - If you think I should eat it I need you to tell me.

Have a look at www.thehungrycyclist.com to find out more about my route and please send me your suggestions...

Many thanks for you time and the kind advice I have recieved already from this forum.

All the best

Tom

The Hungry Cyclist

www.thehungrycyclist.com





#1

12 Replies Related Threads

    Gypsy Bob
    Hamburger
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    RE: Can you help The Hungry Cyclist? 2004/12/04 09:41:25 (permalink)
    Looks like a great trip, but you'll miss our house and all the great Low Country cooking!

    Bob C in NC
    #2
    fcbaldwin
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    RE: Can you help The Hungry Cyclist? 2004/12/04 10:42:19 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Gypsy Bob

    Looks like a great trip, but you'll miss our house and all the great Low Country cooking!

    Bob C in NC



    And all of that wonderful Carolina Que...

    Frank
    #3
    1bbqboy
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    RE: Can you help The Hungry Cyclist? 2004/12/04 11:00:22 (permalink)
    I think the problem here is that his bicycle route doesn't follow the best food route. In fact, based on the Indy to Yellowstone thread,
    http://www.roadfood.com/Forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=5554 -the upper midwest and interior NW must be the black hole of Roadfoodom. I would reverse the idea and cycle sccording to the best regional foods, rather than find the best food along that route. Bicycling the Lewis and Clark Discovery trail, then down the West Coast, or the Santa Fe Trail and on over to the coast is a more appealing slice of America to me, in terms of history, scenery, and food.
    + the South, the East; there's so much to eat and so little time, I guess.
    #4
    mistertawny
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    RE: Can you help The Hungry Cyclist? 2004/12/04 11:04:37 (permalink)
    I did email this directly, but I did want to share my thoughts with all of you......


    I do like the idea of your trip, but I must say that by only going down the west coast of the US you are missing the braod swath that is American cuisine. You might consider a change of direction and head east to Buffalo take a tour of the northeast and then take the Rt. 66 approach from Chicago heading west. That will put you within range of Texas, but also give you delicasies like fried bread, real mequite bbq, GRASS fed beef (no hormones, just the best beef you'll ever have), Chicago hot dogs, Missouri German and Italian cooking (remarkably different from east coast and continental varieties). Going through California, Washington and Oregon outside of SF, the wine country north of SF, and a few places of note in LA there isn't much to be said about the culinary state of the left coast of the USA. Beleive me I know, I am a SF bay area native, who over the years has travelled extensively up and down the coast.

    I live in Kansas now, and the places I have "discovered" out here in the heartland still amaze me. The width of culinary experiences are amazing. We recently found a fish restaurant in land locked Tulsa, Oklahoma that would rival anything on Fisheman's Wharf. We have been going to a Lebanese steak house, where everything on the menu, while a bit different from what I have been use to is delightful. In St. Louis you'll be shocked and awed by arguably some of the best pizza in the world, for under a couple of bucks for a HUGE slice. I can't describe the experiences that are here, that you'll miss. Please reconsider, it'll be totally worth your while.


    #5
    hilldweller
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    RE: Can you help The Hungry Cyclist? 2004/12/04 14:14:33 (permalink)
    I thought at first there was a profile of Marge Simpson in the nifty graphic at the top of your web site, but on second glance maybe not.

    Whatever route you take, it sounds fantastic! And if you do decide to swing by NYC I'm sure that there'd be more than a few Roodfoaders who'd show you around.
    #6
    zussers
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    RE: Can you help The Hungry Cyclist? 2004/12/04 14:44:36 (permalink)
    You gotta head down south Mr. cycle man! Happy eating!
    #7
    4fish
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    RE: Can you help The Hungry Cyclist? 2004/12/04 17:12:40 (permalink)
    Looks like you're heading across Michigan's Upper Peninsula and through the northwest corner of Wisconsin into Minnesota. I haven't spent much time in the UP, so I'm afraid I don't have a particular restaurant to suggest, but you should be able to find a pasty there. A pasty is a hearty meat-and-potato-filled crescent of dough that would make good fuel for cycling.

    One of my favorite vacation spots is Bayfield and the Apostle Islands, off the northern tip of Wisconsin. If you get to Bayfield on a Wednesday or Friday night, try the fish boil at Gruenke's. Potatoes, onions and whitefish served with plenty of melted butter. I've been told that everyone should also try whitefish livers at least once, but I confess that I've never had the nerve. The Bayfield peninsula is also home to numerous orchards.
    #8
    UncleVic
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    RE: Can you help The Hungry Cyclist? 2004/12/04 20:26:40 (permalink)
    Looks like a 10 year road trip... Whew...

    #9
    BT
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    RE: Can you help The Hungry Cyclist? 2004/12/04 22:21:09 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by mistertawny

    We recently found a fish restaurant in land locked Tulsa, Oklahoma that would rival anything on Fisheman's Wharf.


    I hate to say it, but that's because there isn't any food on Fisherman's Wharf, with the possible exception of the outdoor Dungeness cocktails, that's any good. I have never cared for West Coast seafood, having been raised near the Chesapeake and spent considerable time up and down the southern Atlantic and Gulf coasts.

    In general, though, I do endorse your thesis that the left coast culinary scene is over-rated. My problem with it is the obsession with making everything "healthy" at the expense of taste and "fresh" at the expense of traditional preparation methods and ingredients.

    Still, there are things here worth looking for. For one thing, you simply won't find the quality and variety of Asian foods anywhere else that you find in West Coast cities and, increasingly, their suburbs. Here in my winter hideout in Tucson, for example, there hardly seems to exist a Thai restaurant that doesn't feel compelled to also serve Americanized Chinese food because too few people here even know what Thai food is.

    I also think that the Hispanic food scene on the West Coast is hard to beat--certainly in the heartland. I don't say just Mexican because there is so much more than that (Argentine, Brazilian, Central American, Peruvian, Euro-Spanish, even Basque).

    And finally, for those who are into "fresh", the quality of fruits and veggies available in California especially tends to astound people from other parts of the country. Yes, at the height of the season, the garden crops like tomatoes that are available in the East and South may be the best there is, but any veggie lover will think him or herself in heaven upon seeing the produce section of even a mediocre California supermarket. And the farmers markets are, of course, even better.
    #10
    dctourist
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    RE: Can you help The Hungry Cyclist? 2004/12/05 10:45:55 (permalink)
    Hey, I looked at your site - looks like you could use some more data for the Oregon coast.
    This thread http://roadfood.com/Forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=3864&whichpage=1
    was very helpful to me when I planned a trip to Astoria in August. Definitely check out
    Ship's Inn (for halibut and chips - that's about it) and a certain Scandinavian bakery (maybe someone else can help me with the name...) in Astoria are must-try's. If I come up with more maybe I'll post to your site.
    #11
    tiki
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    RE: Can you help The Hungry Cyclist? 2004/12/05 17:26:33 (permalink)
    Two thoughts ---if your trip were only the USof A--then missing the east coast for seafood--the south and espeecially NEW OLEANS and Southern LA!! woulld be a shame--but from a practical view point ---your route makes sence---and as BT has said---the fruits and veggies that are available in Claifornia's central valley is really hard for alot folks to grasp---especially at the Farmers markets that are EVERYWHERE now----there small,independants that are really good old fashioned "truck Farmers" with ENORMOUS variety and wide range of cultural/ethnc backgrounds--In e the market in the northen Ca town of Chico, i had a man that grew nothing but greens---mostly heirloom varieties of any green you couold inagine---there wee 3 or 4 Loation and Hmong stalls with lots of asian foods--melon-sugar cane---a guy that did oyster and ****ake musrooms--a women whose in laws grew wonderful dates down in bottom of the valley--oh how i miss her medjouls!!!---THREE small bakeries--one with an wood fired oven in the foothills that was awesome---then---my MAN!--a third generation olive farmer that markets the family olives---about 8 variteies of prepared olices and the wonderful--small batch hand pressed olive oils available in VARITALS!!! and blends--it was amzing! Seems to me that serious cyclist would do well consider the valley---but remember--its HOT in the summer!!! Bit flat!!!! and there no shortage of raodfood----mexican--thai--BEEF!
    #12
    chicagostyledog
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    RE: Can you help The Hungry Cyclist? 2004/12/06 11:18:04 (permalink)
    If you're traveling along Highway 2 in Michigan north of the Wisconsin border, you'll be a very hungry cyclist, as there aren't many Roadfood choices. If you venture into Vilas County, Wisconsin(Land O Lakes, Boulder Junction, Manitowish Waters) there are many supper clubs and restaurants offering excellent Roadfood (seafood & steaks).
    #13
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