Helpful ReplyHot!Master Plan, Part Deux ....

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Blakkmoon
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Re: Master Plan, Part Deux .... 2017/07/21 12:46:27 (permalink)
One of the things that I have found to be a huge difference between where I live and how things are done in the USA is the flooring.
 
Where I am, the requirement is to have flooring that is as close to 1 single piece as possible, and COVED up the wall a minimum of 4 inches.
 
I have heard a lot of stories of people bringing in trucks from other provinces or from the USA, and they won't pass inspection because the floors are done wrong.

They then have to rip out EVERYTHING and do the floors to meet out code.
 
This is not acceptable:

 
 
This is not acceptable:
 

 
 
This IS acceptable, but it better be perfect.
 

 
 
They don't really seem to like the diamond plate around here.
They want to see the corners CURVED ( coved ) and every seam must be welded.
And smoothed.
 
So even this might not pass because that seam is not smoothed.

 
 
 
What seems to get done around here is that they use rolled vinyl flooring.
It can be fairly easily coved up the walls.
And fairly easily glued together at the seams.
But every one I have seen is the same.
Nobody puts anything BEHIND the cove.
It's just hollow.
 
Also, nobody seems to know how to overlap the corners, inside or outside.
They just match them up and glue them together.
That works well in a house, but not in a moving vehicle.
 
They usually make it through the 1st season, but by the 2nd, the seams are splitting, the coves are pushed through.
And they charge on average 2 grand for this crap!
 
Well we won't know if what I'm doing is better or not until it's been around for a while...
But here goes.
 
MY coves are galvanized steel.
They are the rounded corner beads for doing drywall.
 

 
 
The metal is strong, yet flexible.
 
I peeled off the paper backing.

 
 
I put adhesive on the backside.

Then stapled it to my floor.


 
 
I was kind of worried that the SMOOTHNESS of the metal would not take to the coating very well.
So I sprayed it with some primer I had lying around.
Where the heck I got green primer.... I don't know.

But I still thought it was a little too smooth.
I found a can of spray on adhesive in the shop.
 

 
It went on sort of half mist spray and half spider web -  webby -- ??
 
The texture was good to help the next coating stick.
 

 
I even went up the walls to the coating had something to grab onto.
 
 
So far I have put down 2 coats of this stuff.

 
Will it work?
Only time will tell.
 
I can only say that we used it in our store, on stairs, over top of laminate flooring, and in 2 years, it only needed an occasional touch up.
In my books, that's pretty good.
 
Plus I got it on clearance on one of my recent trips.
Got 2 of the big 4 or 5 gallon pails for just under $40.  woo hoo!
Once it dries and cures, I will top it with epoxy.
I got this kit.
Hopefully the combination of the 2 coatings will be durable enough.
My contact at the HD loved the sample when I showed him.
post edited by Blakkmoon - 2017/07/21 12:49:12
Blakkmoon
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Re: Master Plan, Part Deux .... 2017/07/21 18:58:23 (permalink)
Put on the last coating of the Restore product.
 
Now its going to take a couple of days to dry.

 
 
The texture is similar to fiberglass resin.

 
 
The goal here is that the Restore product is what bonds to the wood surface of the floor.
 
And with the rough sandy finish, the epoxy will bond well to that.

 
I didn't bother to get it tinted, so it is fairly translucent.
Blakkmoon
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Re: Master Plan, Part Deux .... 2017/07/23 23:10:18 (permalink)
Really hot and humid around here for the last few days.
Seems to be taking forever for the floor to finish curing.


So while I am waiting, I got some other stuff finished.
 
Spent the day lying under the truck ripping apart the front end.
Replaced the tie rod ends, and sway bar bushings.
 
Then went to the back and installed my overload springs.

 
Love these things.
Used them for years on lots of other trucks.
They just bolt on to the axle.
They don't do anything until you get a good load on.
 
I actually had to cut them down a bit just to fit them in.
 
Truck rides so nice now.\
No more clunking.
Nice and tight.
My alignment is actually better now than it was before.
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