Helpful ReplyHot!Minneapolis / St. Paul Crawl: April 25th to 28th, 2019

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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/14 18:11:59 (permalink)
BuddyRoadhouse
We don't want to sacrifice any Roadfood stalwarts, but if we're traveling all that way to get a regional taste of the Twin Cities, this is what's starting to define it.  In fact the argument could be made that this trend is the very definition of Roadfood; locally owned restaurants using locally grown ingredients, prepared by people who are passionate about their product.
 
 
 
Buddy


 
Correct, and as a local in Rhode Island- this is where the locals eat as we watch the touristas head to the seasonaly only clamshacks - look at the menu! - this is Rhode island Roadfood! Farm to table!
 
http://theshantyri.com/
 
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/14 18:12:55 (permalink)
BuddyRoadhouse
What's the level of interest for hitting some of these higher end places that are coming to dominate the MSP food scene?

I'm not interested in anyplace that's described as "trendy", "inventive", "cutting edge" etc.
 
My choice for "higher end" would be Murray's, but I don't know how many people (especially those incurring significant travel expenses just to get to and from MSP) would be willing to fork out that much green for a meal.  Still, it's a place I'd like to try...if not as part of the crawl then perhaps another day.  Perhaps Rumaki can suggest a different longtime steakhouse that's not quite as expensive?
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/14 18:34:16 (permalink)
Are there any Supper Clubs near the Twin Cities? They are usually good choices for steaks (and walleye) at a lower price than Steakhouses. The typical "woodsy" atmosphere is usually a treat for non-Midwesterners.
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/14 19:07:46 (permalink)
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BuddyRoadhouse
What's the level of interest for hitting some of these higher end places that are coming to dominate the MSP food scene?

I'm not interested in anyplace that's described as "trendy", "inventive", "cutting edge" etc.
 
My choice for "higher end" would be Murray's, but I don't know how many people (especially those incurring significant travel expenses just to get to and from MSP) would be willing to fork out that much green for a meal.  Still, it's a place I'd like to try...if not as part of the crawl then perhaps another day.  Perhaps Rumaki can suggest a different longtime steakhouse that's not quite as expensive?


Murray's lunch menu looks a little more affordable.  Actually, at the end of a long day of Roadfooding, when we're already stuffed and only want a taste or two of a full entree, even Murray's dinner prices look reasonable, when split among 3-4 or more people.
 
I've had another suggestion for a place called Mancini's Char House, over on the St. Paul side.  Prices for comparable items look about the same.
 
Not sure about the Supper Club availability west of the St. Croix/Mississippi, but you're welcome to research and report.  The list is still wide open at this point.
 
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/14 19:32:57 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby joerogo 2018/08/14 21:35:36
BuddyRoadhouse
joe,
Hmongtown Market is already on the short (getting longer by the day) list.  Once we've settled on a date (more on that coming soon, promise!) I'll release what I've got so far, along with links, so people can get an idea of the direction we're going and provide the usual gentle, thoughtful feedback.
 
Buddy




 
That's us! Gentle and thoughtful. 
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/14 20:02:53 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby wanderingjew 2018/08/14 20:18:07
wanderingjew
Buddy
 
It's not only Minnesota -it's everywhere.
Although I notice everyone has as bug up their  butt about traditional regional food, not only in the Twin Cities but in Denver and Boston as well (give me all the hotdish, Swedish Meatballs, rocky mountain oysters, buffalo steaks and cod cakes, baked beans and brown bread-they're all delicious and I love it).  Yet everyone thinks that the stale, out of date Jewish Deli's in NYC proliferate by thousands with 20 million happy families going there on a daily basis.
I could post daily reviews here in Rhode Island of Banh Mi, Korean BBQ, Burgers, Shawarma, Cubans and Shrimp and Grits and completely dismiss the touristy Clam Shacks, Hot Wieners, Pizza Strips and Coffee Milk as if they never existed. Everyone thinks of Italian and Portuguese when they think of Rhode Island- not any more it's not- it's all Dominican and Hmong now...
 
So to answer the question- NO - this is not unique to Minnesota- it's happening everywhere.
Recently it seems a few Roadfooders traveled to Denver and it seems their restaurant picks seemed like a tour around the college hill/west end neighborhood of Providence (not that there is anything wrong with that)
I went to Denver and the environ's back in the spring. and found some excellent LOCAL MOUNTAIN MAN regional Roadfood.



Nobody's got a bug up their butt about traditional regional food; I'm all for it.  The question is, what defines it?  Immigrant populations are ever changing in any given area, and demographics are fluid.  Therefore the regionally appropriate cuisine of 40 years ago (or more) is not necessarily the same as it is today.
 
You've actually made the argument for me with your statement about Jewish Delis in NYC.  They didn't just pop up because of the herds of wild pastramis grazing across the wind swept plains of lower Manhattan.  They were established more than a hundred years ago when a large population of immigrant European Jews settled in the area and used locally available ingredients to provide an approximation of home.  Now new immigrants are settling the area, and new cuisines are dominating, thus becoming the new Regionally Appropriate food.  Whether we like it or not.
 
If we're going to define "regionally appropriate" only by the foods brought into an area by the original "settlers", then we need to go all the way back and say the only real Roadfood is fry bread and boiled buffalo hump.  Okay, in the Pacific Northwest you can add in some smoked salmon.
 
I think a better term to use here is "Regional Specialty".  Chicago Style Hot Dogs, KC BBQ, Pittsburgh's Turkey Devonshire, along with all the examples you stated above represent historical contributions to the food heritage of a city or geographic area.  Some have staying power, others fade into obscurity.  I'm all in favor of celebrating and trying to preserve heritage food specialties, but not at the expense of ignoring new ones.
 
A prime example is the Jibarito Sandwich, invented right here in Chicago's Puerto Rican neighborhood, Humboldt Park*, less than 25 years ago.  Most people only allow the CSD, Italian Beef Sandwich, and Deep Dish Pizza as the defining Regional Specialties of Our Town.  Mention the Jibarito, which is as Chicago-centric as any of the others, and most folks either won't know what you're talking about, or reject the notion that it deserves to be considered as a Regional Specialty.
 
Sometimes it's not a specific food item that defines a city or region, occasionally it's a group of traditions.  Take the exemplary Pittsburgh Crawl from 2016.  Granted we had Primanti's and White Fish Sandwiches on the itinerary, but there was so much more.  Who would have thought one of the highlights of the weekend would be a BBQ dinner at the Italo-American Club?  And what about The Strip?  We weren't there for just a single item, but a range of foods from multiple ethnicities featuring various specialties.
 
Maybe the best example was Big Jim's where we got Italian food.  It wasn't so much about the food (which was pretty good) so much as it was the character.  The sauce was red, but the collars were all blue in this working man's haven.  In fact that's what all the food in Pittsburgh was about.  The Burgh has taken on Chicago's old mantle as the City of Broad Shoulders, stormy, husky, brawling, to quote Carl Sandburg.
 
So when we get to MSP, we'll absolutely honor the area's longstanding Scandinavian roots, but we can't ignore the new traditions that are reshaping the Twin Cities in positive ways.
 
Buddy
 
*Another example of fluidity; when my Dad grew up in Humboldt Park in the '30s and '40s it was primarily Eastern European Jewish together with Polish and Italian families.  Even with that population it was home to Norwegian American Hospital, evidence of yet another ethnicity prior to my Dad's generation.  My Grandparents still lived there when I was growing up, and I got to witness firsthand the influx of the Puerto Rican community.
 
In recent years, gentrification is taking over the neighborhood, pushing the Puerto Ricans out, not without loud protest.  It remains to be seen who the next residents will be, and if they even represent a specific ethnicity, or just a particular level of affluence.
 
B.
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/14 20:23:51 (permalink)
Yes....I get "new Immigration" like I said previously I've embraced Asian-American and fusion roadfood across the West Coast including Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angeles and would rather have a Crazy Roll or Chinese Chicken Salad over an "In N Out"  . My point is that I'm kinda miffed that we didn't explore this more in Pittsburgh, Chicago, Cincinnatti and Kansas City-  perhaps we should have done less Chicago Dogs and more Jibarito, perhaps less burnt ends in Kansas City and more Peruvian Chicken. I guess the question is why didn't we explore the new waves of immigation in the aforementioned cities (I would even throw in Nashville- but I didn't attend said event so I won't) yet all of a sudden we're all over it in MSP?
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/14 20:30:19 (permalink)
JRPfeff
Are there any Supper Clubs near the Twin Cities? They are usually good choices for steaks (and walleye) at a lower price than Steakhouses. The typical "woodsy" atmosphere is usually a treat for non-Midwesterners.

I did a Google search but the results are kind of lukewarm:
 
https://www.google.com/ma.../data=!4m3!2m2!5m1!4e3
 
Gulden's in Maplewood looks like my kind of place.
post edited by ScreamingChicken - 2018/08/14 20:43:48
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/14 20:43:49 (permalink)
JRPfeff
Are there any Supper Clubs near the Twin Cities? They are usually good choices for steaks (and walleye) at a lower price than Steakhouses. The typical "woodsy" atmosphere is usually a treat for non-Midwesterners.


 
Hmmn...sounds like this place
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/14 20:48:14 (permalink)
I knew you were here for a reason Dale. Do they have hotdish?
post edited by JRPfeff - 2018/08/14 20:49:40
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/14 20:48:48 (permalink)
And this looks like my kind of place
 
 
http://mplsdog.com/
 
 
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/14 20:52:43 (permalink)
wanderingjew
And this looks like my kind of place
 
http://mplsdog.com/

It's like Minneapolis meets Pittsburgh...instead of slaw & fries it's hotdish & tots.  But the big difference is that while the Primanti's sandwich was created out of necessity, the MPLS Dog appears to be a marketing creation.
post edited by ScreamingChicken - 2018/08/14 20:55:49
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/15 01:26:28 (permalink)
Uncle Franky's, where this um, interesting looking concoction is exclusively available, is already on the list of candidates.  They've made their name selling CSDs, Detroit Coneys, and Philly Cheesesteaks.  In Minneapolis.  But ya never know.  It might be harder than anticipated to fill 15-18 slots over three days, and they might make the final list.
 
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/15 01:59:11 (permalink)
wanderingjew
Yes....I get "new Immigration" like I said previously I've embraced Asian-American and fusion roadfood across the West Coast including Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angeles and would rather have a Crazy Roll or Chinese Chicken Salad over an "In N Out"  . My point is that I'm kinda miffed that we didn't explore this more in Pittsburgh, Chicago, Cincinnatti and Kansas City-  perhaps we should have done less Chicago Dogs and more Jibarito, perhaps less burnt ends in Kansas City and more Peruvian Chicken. I guess the question is why didn't we explore the new waves of immigation in the aforementioned cities (I would even throw in Nashville- but I didn't attend said event so I won't) yet all of a sudden we're all over it in MSP?



Because we're getting better and smarter with each Crawl we get under our belt, that's why.  And because even though there is still plenty of evidence of MSP's Scandinavian heritage, these new ethnicities have been flowing into the Twin Cities and leaving their culinary mark in unprecedented ways.   Just like Chicago has more Poles than any other city in the world outside Warsaw, Minneapolis has the highest populations of both Somalis and Hmong compared to every metropolitan area in the United States.
 
That's the short answer.  The longer answer looks like this:
 
For the record, there was some diversity on past tours.  Maybe not as much as we could have done, but as I say, we're learning with each Crawl.
 
For example, we did do Peruvian Chicken in KC.  Okay fine, it was Mexican Chicken, but the prep was the same; well marinated half chickens grilled over an open wood flame.  We also had the Slovenian sweet bread Povitica.
 
Pittsburgh, as I said earlier, included a wide variety of local specialties from many nationalities including Italian, Polish, and Hungarian.
 
The Chicago tour involved only one day of intense CSD and Italian Beef consumption.  The rest of the trip included Polish at U-Gazdy, Mexican Seafood at La Palapa, Italian breakfast sandwiches at Miceli's Deli, Smoked Fish at Calumet Fisheries, and Soul Food dessert at Jimmy Jamm Pies, among others.  And although we went to Freddy's strictly for Italian Beef, we mostly avoided it, opting for a wide ranging Italian feast instead.
 
To be honest, it just didn't occur to us to go deep into Chicago's ethnic diversity back then.  It was the second outing after the Cincinnati Chili Crawl which was hardcore Chili for an entire day.  ChiTownDiner and I decided to break up the Chicago Crawl with Friday devoted to non-CSD/IB foods, and all CSD/IBs on Saturday.
 
We were still figuring it out at that point.  If we had it to do over again (and there's a good chance we will someday if demand is there), I'd include Contingent favorites like Ed's Potsticker House, Don Pedro's Carnitas, Ba Le Banh Mi, and many other ethnic favorites.  I'd still include the usual Chicago suspects, but I wouldn't clump them all into one day again.  I'd mix and match things to better reflect the city's diversity.
 
Ralph and Lori Melton really changed the game the following year.  They did a remarkable job of giving us a grand culinary tour of Pittsburgh.  They set a new benchmark and helped shape future Crawls.  They hit all the right notes by combining Pittsburgh's iconic Roadfood with lesser known food traditions.
 
Kansas City presented new challenges in that it has a reputation as a one note (BBQ) food destination.  I wrestled with CNW over the KC itinerary for weeks.  We agreed that 'Que would be the main focus with BPTs and Fried Chicken as co-stars.  It was easy to ignore the Asian scene because it is still developing there.  Don't get me wrong, after three decades of regular visits, we have our favorite Thai, Indian, and Vietnamese places in KC, but none of them are particular standouts, or suited to a large group.
 
As for Nashville, I'll just say that Davidsanders did an outstanding job putting together the initial list.  It mixed the classic "Meat and Three" joints with Hot Chicken, BBQ, and dive bar Burgers.  ChiTownDiner swooped in and put the whole thing in order, giving the weekend a good flow.  I'll take credit for making sure the spelling was correct on his Spreadsheet.
 
And that's how we got to this point.  Each successive Crawl made us better and smarter at organizing and picking the right stops for a large group who wants to experience the well known regional specialties balanced and mixed with a broader cross section of the local cuisine.
 
As of now we've got both your recommendations of Carol's Restaurant and Kaffe Stuga on the list.  If you have any other specific suggestions you feel we're missing, please let me know so they can be considered with the rest of the candidates.
 
Buddy
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/15 07:13:03 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby nagle 2018/08/15 15:57:41
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BuddyRoadhouse
joe,
Hmongtown Market is already on the short (getting longer by the day) list.  Once we've settled on a date (more on that coming soon, promise!) I'll release what I've got so far, along with links, so people can get an idea of the direction we're going and provide the usual gentle, thoughtful feedback.
 
Buddy




 
That's us! Gentle and thoughtful. 




I hear that all the time at home, on the road and at work!  CTD - The Gentle & Thoughtful One!  
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/15 07:17:29 (permalink)
BuddyRoadhouse
wanderingjew
Buddy
 
It's not only Minnesota -it's everywhere.
Although I notice everyone has as bug up their  butt about traditional regional food, not only in the Twin Cities but in Denver and Boston as well (give me all the hotdish, Swedish Meatballs, rocky mountain oysters, buffalo steaks and cod cakes, baked beans and brown bread-they're all delicious and I love it).  Yet everyone thinks that the stale, out of date Jewish Deli's in NYC proliferate by thousands with 20 million happy families going there on a daily basis.
I could post daily reviews here in Rhode Island of Banh Mi, Korean BBQ, Burgers, Shawarma, Cubans and Shrimp and Grits and completely dismiss the touristy Clam Shacks, Hot Wieners, Pizza Strips and Coffee Milk as if they never existed. Everyone thinks of Italian and Portuguese when they think of Rhode Island- not any more it's not- it's all Dominican and Hmong now...
 
So to answer the question- NO - this is not unique to Minnesota- it's happening everywhere.
Recently it seems a few Roadfooders traveled to Denver and it seems their restaurant picks seemed like a tour around the college hill/west end neighborhood of Providence (not that there is anything wrong with that)
I went to Denver and the environ's back in the spring. and found some excellent LOCAL MOUNTAIN MAN regional Roadfood.



Nobody's got a bug up their butt about traditional regional food; I'm all for it.  The question is, what defines it?  Immigrant populations are ever changing in any given area, and demographics are fluid.  Therefore the regionally appropriate cuisine of 40 years ago (or more) is not necessarily the same as it is today.
 
You've actually made the argument for me with your statement about Jewish Delis in NYC.  They didn't just pop up because of the herds of wild pastramis grazing across the wind swept plains of lower Manhattan.  They were established more than a hundred years ago when a large population of immigrant European Jews settled in the area and used locally available ingredients to provide an approximation of home.  Now new immigrants are settling the area, and new cuisines are dominating, thus becoming the new Regionally Appropriate food.  Whether we like it or not.
 
If we're going to define "regionally appropriate" only by the foods brought into an area by the original "settlers", then we need to go all the way back and say the only real Roadfood is fry bread and boiled buffalo hump.  Okay, in the Pacific Northwest you can add in some smoked salmon.
 
I think a better term to use here is "Regional Specialty".  Chicago Style Hot Dogs, KC BBQ, Pittsburgh's Turkey Devonshire, along with all the examples you stated above represent historical contributions to the food heritage of a city or geographic area.  Some have staying power, others fade into obscurity.  I'm all in favor of celebrating and trying to preserve heritage food specialties, but not at the expense of ignoring new ones.
 
A prime example is the Jibarito Sandwich, invented right here in Chicago's Puerto Rican neighborhood, Humboldt Park*, less than 25 years ago.  Most people only allow the CSD, Italian Beef Sandwich, and Deep Dish Pizza as the defining Regional Specialties of Our Town.  Mention the Jibarito, which is as Chicago-centric as any of the others, and most folks either won't know what you're talking about, or reject the notion that it deserves to be considered as a Regional Specialty.
 
Sometimes it's not a specific food item that defines a city or region, occasionally it's a group of traditions.  Take the exemplary Pittsburgh Crawl from 2016.  Granted we had Primanti's and White Fish Sandwiches on the itinerary, but there was so much more.  Who would have thought one of the highlights of the weekend would be a BBQ dinner at the Italo-American Club?  And what about The Strip?  We weren't there for just a single item, but a range of foods from multiple ethnicities featuring various specialties.
 
Maybe the best example was Big Jim's where we got Italian food.  It wasn't so much about the food (which was pretty good) so much as it was the character.  The sauce was red, but the collars were all blue in this working man's haven.  In fact that's what all the food in Pittsburgh was about.  The Burgh has taken on Chicago's old mantle as the City of Broad Shoulders, stormy, husky, brawling, to quote Carl Sandburg.
 
So when we get to MSP, we'll absolutely honor the area's longstanding Scandinavian roots, but we can't ignore the new traditions that are reshaping the Twin Cities in positive ways.
 
Buddy
 
*Another example of fluidity; when my Dad grew up in Humboldt Park in the '30s and '40s it was primarily Eastern European Jewish together with Polish and Italian families.  Even with that population it was home to Norwegian American Hospital, evidence of yet another ethnicity prior to my Dad's generation.  My Grandparents still lived there when I was growing up, and I got to witness firsthand the influx of the Puerto Rican community.
 
In recent years, gentrification is taking over the neighborhood, pushing the Puerto Ricans out, not without loud protest.  It remains to be seen who the next residents will be, and if they even represent a specific ethnicity, or just a particular level of affluence.
 
B.




Love seeing the winds change direction....how many Roadfooders can fit in the doghouse and if Dale's in there with me, I'm breaking out the back door!  After all, there's Cortados just down the street....or a Charred Salami ON a hot dog bun!  
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/15 07:24:11 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby Wintahaba 2018/08/15 13:34:43
wanderingjew
Yes....I get "new Immigration" like I said previously I've embraced Asian-American and fusion roadfood across the West Coast including Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angeles and would rather have a Crazy Roll or Chinese Chicken Salad over an "In N Out"  . My point is that I'm kinda miffed that we didn't explore this more in Pittsburgh, Chicago, Cincinnatti and Kansas City-  perhaps we should have done less Chicago Dogs and more Jibarito, perhaps less burnt ends in Kansas City and more Peruvian Chicken. I guess the question is why didn't we explore the new waves of immigation in the aforementioned cities (I would even throw in Nashville- but I didn't attend said event so I won't) yet all of a sudden we're all over it in MSP?




Always working In N Out into the conversion.  Just can't help yourself....
 
I think the crawls have been well run.   They are more work than most realize, we have continued to improve and no one has to do everything on the list and anyone can add whatever they want to their list.  
 
It's a working diagram, flow chart or list gathered from many different styles, people, posts, etc.  We also try to honor the Roadfood books and website in our compilation...at least I do.  Secret Society may have different plans.  
 
Also, when I think about a city and its history as known to me (I do create my own with Russian influences), I like to check that stuff out.  It would not include Somali Cuisine in MSP.  It would include Polish in CHicago or hearty steel worker sandwiches like Primanti's in PIT or BBQ in Nashville.  
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/15 07:31:55 (permalink)
ChiTownDiner
BuddyRoadhouse
wanderingjew
Buddy
 
It's not only Minnesota -it's everywhere.
Although I notice everyone has as bug up their  butt about traditional regional food, not only in the Twin Cities but in Denver and Boston as well (give me all the hotdish, Swedish Meatballs, rocky mountain oysters, buffalo steaks and cod cakes, baked beans and brown bread-they're all delicious and I love it).  Yet everyone thinks that the stale, out of date Jewish Deli's in NYC proliferate by thousands with 20 million happy families going there on a daily basis.
I could post daily reviews here in Rhode Island of Banh Mi, Korean BBQ, Burgers, Shawarma, Cubans and Shrimp and Grits and completely dismiss the touristy Clam Shacks, Hot Wieners, Pizza Strips and Coffee Milk as if they never existed. Everyone thinks of Italian and Portuguese when they think of Rhode Island- not any more it's not- it's all Dominican and Hmong now...
 
So to answer the question- NO - this is not unique to Minnesota- it's happening everywhere.
Recently it seems a few Roadfooders traveled to Denver and it seems their restaurant picks seemed like a tour around the college hill/west end neighborhood of Providence (not that there is anything wrong with that)
I went to Denver and the environ's back in the spring. and found some excellent LOCAL MOUNTAIN MAN regional Roadfood.



Nobody's got a bug up their butt about traditional regional food; I'm all for it.  The question is, what defines it?  Immigrant populations are ever changing in any given area, and demographics are fluid.  Therefore the regionally appropriate cuisine of 40 years ago (or more) is not necessarily the same as it is today.
 
You've actually made the argument for me with your statement about Jewish Delis in NYC.  They didn't just pop up because of the herds of wild pastramis grazing across the wind swept plains of lower Manhattan.  They were established more than a hundred years ago when a large population of immigrant European Jews settled in the area and used locally available ingredients to provide an approximation of home.  Now new immigrants are settling the area, and new cuisines are dominating, thus becoming the new Regionally Appropriate food.  Whether we like it or not.
 
If we're going to define "regionally appropriate" only by the foods brought into an area by the original "settlers", then we need to go all the way back and say the only real Roadfood is fry bread and boiled buffalo hump.  Okay, in the Pacific Northwest you can add in some smoked salmon.
 
I think a better term to use here is "Regional Specialty".  Chicago Style Hot Dogs, KC BBQ, Pittsburgh's Turkey Devonshire, along with all the examples you stated above represent historical contributions to the food heritage of a city or geographic area.  Some have staying power, others fade into obscurity.  I'm all in favor of celebrating and trying to preserve heritage food specialties, but not at the expense of ignoring new ones.
 
A prime example is the Jibarito Sandwich, invented right here in Chicago's Puerto Rican neighborhood, Humboldt Park*, less than 25 years ago.  Most people only allow the CSD, Italian Beef Sandwich, and Deep Dish Pizza as the defining Regional Specialties of Our Town.  Mention the Jibarito, which is as Chicago-centric as any of the others, and most folks either won't know what you're talking about, or reject the notion that it deserves to be considered as a Regional Specialty.
 
Sometimes it's not a specific food item that defines a city or region, occasionally it's a group of traditions.  Take the exemplary Pittsburgh Crawl from 2016.  Granted we had Primanti's and White Fish Sandwiches on the itinerary, but there was so much more.  Who would have thought one of the highlights of the weekend would be a BBQ dinner at the Italo-American Club?  And what about The Strip?  We weren't there for just a single item, but a range of foods from multiple ethnicities featuring various specialties.
 
Maybe the best example was Big Jim's where we got Italian food.  It wasn't so much about the food (which was pretty good) so much as it was the character.  The sauce was red, but the collars were all blue in this working man's haven.  In fact that's what all the food in Pittsburgh was about.  The Burgh has taken on Chicago's old mantle as the City of Broad Shoulders, stormy, husky, brawling, to quote Carl Sandburg.
 
So when we get to MSP, we'll absolutely honor the area's longstanding Scandinavian roots, but we can't ignore the new traditions that are reshaping the Twin Cities in positive ways.
 
Buddy
 
*Another example of fluidity; when my Dad grew up in Humboldt Park in the '30s and '40s it was primarily Eastern European Jewish together with Polish and Italian families.  Even with that population it was home to Norwegian American Hospital, evidence of yet another ethnicity prior to my Dad's generation.  My Grandparents still lived there when I was growing up, and I got to witness firsthand the influx of the Puerto Rican community.
 
In recent years, gentrification is taking over the neighborhood, pushing the Puerto Ricans out, not without loud protest.  It remains to be seen who the next residents will be, and if they even represent a specific ethnicity, or just a particular level of affluence.
 
B.




Love seeing the winds change direction....how many Roadfooders can fit in the doghouse and if Dale's in there with me, I'm breaking out the back door!  After all, there's Cortados just down the street....or a Charred Salami ON a hot dog bun!  




You still have lots of Roadfooders on here that want to visit that old, ancient, antiquated museum, Katz's when they visit NYC- why Katz's- because it's essentially the only Jewish Deli left in NY- that and the other few that hang around for the tourists- I don't see everyone talking about what I consider NYC roadfood- the Korean Deli's of flushing , the Dominican Bodega's of Spanish Harlem or the Ghahanian restaurants of the Bronx.
Why did we concentrate so much on BBQ and Fried Chicken in Kansas City?- maybe we should have focused more on Asian and Mexican roadfood- and gone to maybe one BBQ joint (or perhaps none at all)- Why so many 5 way chili joints in Cincinnati? Maybe we should have gone to one (or none at all) and focus on some of the burgeoning Asian restaurants (I know TJ Jackson would vouch for that)
I don't see why we focused so much on Chicago Style Dogs and Italian Beef- perhaps we should have focused more on Chinese and Banh Mi. 
You mentioned plenty of European Immigrants for Chicago, Pittsburgh etc but very little or no Asian, African or Latin American Immigrants when there are plenty.
It seems that the Twin Cities is being treated very differently.
 
Oh, by the way, we plan to go to Boston sometime over the weekend if the weather holds out- and we plan to visit the classic, iconic fantastic Durgin Park- a restaurant that many on the forum abhor
 
edit **Oh and Sandra went to school in Boston, she lived in Boston, her older sister still lives in suburban Boston and she totally agrees with me about Boston Roadfood and I can assure you all she does not agree with me about everything.
She hates anything with hot dogs, Italian Sausage, anything spicy and absolutely refused to have a garbage plate at Nick Tahou in Rochester.
post edited by wanderingjew - 2018/08/15 07:45:12
ScreamingChicken
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/15 09:49:56 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby ChiTownDiner 2018/08/15 10:50:01
Roadfooders vs. Foodies...the battle since the dawn of time!
JRPfeff
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/15 10:08:32 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby ChiTownDiner 2018/08/15 10:50:08
ScreamingChicken
Roadfooders vs. Foodies...the battle since the dawn of time!


Butt out of this for your own good. Stay out of the crossfire.
ChiTownDiner
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/15 10:50:28 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby joerogo 2018/08/15 18:58:47
JRPfeff
ScreamingChicken
Roadfooders vs. Foodies...the battle since the dawn of time!


Butt out of this for your own good. Stay out of the crossfire.




Very Rogo-esque of you!  
JRPfeff
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/15 12:28:41 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby schlotz 2018/08/15 12:44:29
ChiTownDiner
JRPfeff
ScreamingChicken
Roadfooders vs. Foodies...the battle since the dawn of time!


Butt out of this for your own good. Stay out of the crossfire.




Very Rogo-esque of you!  


Do you need replacement windows?
rumaki
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/15 13:23:24 (permalink)
"Are there any Supper Clubs near the Twin Cities? They are usually good choices for steaks (and walleye) at a lower price than Steakhouses. The typical "woodsy" atmosphere is usually a treat for non-Midwesterners."
 
My favorite, favorite supper club was Little Jack's in Nordeast (no relation to Jax, which still exists and is nearby).
It closed about 10 years ago and I miss it very much.  https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/end-era-little-jacks-closes-its-doors/
 
I don't much like Jax, although it is quite popular, especially for Sunday brunch, I gather. Every time I've gone for dinner the service has been only so-so.  It's main claim to fame is that you can "net" your own rainbow trout from their stream. http://jaxcafe.com/
 
I haven't found another supper club that I like as well at Little Jack'sThe Lexington, in St. Paul, is not really a supper club as such, but it's been around forever, was recently sold/bought and renovated. https://thelexmn.com/ I ate there with a group in June, and they put us in a room in the area off the bar which sort of has that "woodsy" feel.
 
Another possibility is Jensen's in Eagan; sort of a cross between supper club and steakhouse.  I've only eaten there once.  It was OK, but not so wonderful that I felt the need to return.  https://jensensfoodandcocktails.com/
 
I went to Mancini's once. It has a strong local following.  It didn't do it for me -- they put some kind of seasoning on the steaks that I didn't care for. http://www.mancinis.com/
 
Another option that is rarely mentioned -- maybe because it is next door to a strip club -- is JD Hoyt's.  I haven't been there for several years, but it was not bad when I went, and I took visitors there once. They had been to Little Jack's and had really liked it, so after it closed, we went to Hoyt's, and although they thought it was OK, they found Hoyt's inferior.   http://jdhoyts.com/
 
I think you have to venture farther out from "the Cities" to find the real thing. For example, Weiderholt's in Hastings is one.  We ate there on our anniversary some years ago (one of my husband's students recommended it), and they gave us a small "celebration" cake for free. http://www.wiederholtssupperclub.com/

 
Blurb from their menu:
 

Favorite menu selections include Prime Rib, Chicken Kiev, Steak & Shrimp, Lobster Tail, Halibut, Walleye, Barbecued Baby Back Ribs, Crab Legs, plus a great selection of steak.

Each dinner includes a relish tray, hot rolls, choice of salad or cottage cheese, and choice of potato-baked, french fries, hash browns, or for $1 more try our sweet potatoes.
 
 
The Red Stag Supper Club in Minneapolis is quite good, but in no way, shape or form is it a traditional supper club. http://www.redstagsupperclub.com/
 
If you want to combine food with bowling, there's always Elsie's. http://www.elsies.com/  Or Bryant-Lake Bowl
http://www.bryantlakebowl.com/  Definitely a Minneapolis "thing."
 
 
post edited by rumaki - 2018/08/15 13:31:22
JRPfeff
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/15 13:35:40 (permalink)
rumaki,
 
Thank you for that thoughtful reply.
rumaki
 
If you want to combine food with bowling, there's always Elsie's. http://www.elsies.com/  Or Bryant-Lake Bowl
http://www.bryantlakebowl.com/  Definitely a Minneapolis "thing."

Food & bowling has BuddyRoadhouse written all over it.
ScreamingChicken
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/15 13:41:26 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby Wintahaba 2018/08/15 13:50:53
I look forward to a spirited discussion of the differences between a traditional bowling alley and a modern bowling center...
Wintahaba
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/15 13:52:50 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby buffetbuster 2018/08/15 14:13:13
...
ScreamingChicken
I look forward to a spirited discussion of the differences between a traditional bowling alley and a modern bowling center...


..or the regional appropriateness of Tenpin vs Duckpin vs Candlepin....
Guest
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/15 15:11:36 (permalink)
ScreamingChicken
I look forward to a spirited discussion of the differences between a traditional bowling alley and a modern bowling center...




Oh, that's easy.
A traditional Minnesota bowling alley has bowling balls that are dipped in Tater Tot Hotdish.
ChiTownDiner
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/15 17:01:03 (permalink)
rumaki
"Are there any Supper Clubs near the Twin Cities? They are usually good choices for steaks (and walleye) at a lower price than Steakhouses. The typical "woodsy" atmosphere is usually a treat for non-Midwesterners."
 
My favorite, favorite supper club was Little Jack's in Nordeast (no relation to Jax, which still exists and is nearby).
It closed about 10 years ago and I miss it very much.  https://www.tcdailyplanet.net/end-era-little-jacks-closes-its-doors/
 
I don't much like Jax, although it is quite popular, especially for Sunday brunch, I gather. Every time I've gone for dinner the service has been only so-so.  It's main claim to fame is that you can "net" your own rainbow trout from their stream. http://jaxcafe.com/
 
I haven't found another supper club that I like as well at Little Jack'sThe Lexington, in St. Paul, is not really a supper club as such, but it's been around forever, was recently sold/bought and renovated. https://thelexmn.com/ I ate there with a group in June, and they put us in a room in the area off the bar which sort of has that "woodsy" feel.
 
Another possibility is Jensen's in Eagan; sort of a cross between supper club and steakhouse.  I've only eaten there once.  It was OK, but not so wonderful that I felt the need to return.  https://jensensfoodandcocktails.com/
 
I went to Mancini's once. It has a strong local following.  It didn't do it for me -- they put some kind of seasoning on the steaks that I didn't care for. http://www.mancinis.com/
 
Another option that is rarely mentioned -- maybe because it is next door to a strip club -- is JD Hoyt's.  I haven't been there for several years, but it was not bad when I went, and I took visitors there once. They had been to Little Jack's and had really liked it, so after it closed, we went to Hoyt's, and although they thought it was OK, they found Hoyt's inferior.   http://jdhoyts.com/
 
I think you have to venture farther out from "the Cities" to find the real thing. For example, Weiderholt's in Hastings is one.  We ate there on our anniversary some years ago (one of my husband's students recommended it), and they gave us a small "celebration" cake for free. http://www.wiederholtssupperclub.com/

 
Blurb from their menu:
 

Favorite menu selections include Prime Rib, Chicken Kiev, Steak & Shrimp, Lobster Tail, Halibut, Walleye, Barbecued Baby Back Ribs, Crab Legs, plus a great selection of steak.

Each dinner includes a relish tray, hot rolls, choice of salad or cottage cheese, and choice of potato-baked, french fries, hash browns, or for $1 more try our sweet potatoes.
 
 
The Red Stag Supper Club in Minneapolis is quite good, but in no way, shape or form is it a traditional supper club. http://www.redstagsupperclub.com/
 
If you want to combine food with bowling, there's always Elsie's. http://www.elsies.com/  Or Bryant-Lake Bowl
http://www.bryantlakebowl.com/  Definitely a Minneapolis "thing."
 
 




What a great list of suggestions...thanks!  
ChiTownDiner
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/15 17:01:39 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby nagle 2018/08/16 16:33:13
Wintahaba
...
ScreamingChicken
I look forward to a spirited discussion of the differences between a traditional bowling alley and a modern bowling center...


..or the regional appropriateness of Tenpin vs Duckpin vs Candlepin....




Gotta have a Disco Ball!  
abe_froeman
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Re: 2019 Crawl Location Discussion Thread 2018/08/16 16:24:05 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby nagle 2018/08/16 16:36:18
If you're looking for a little upscale, a little trendy, Mr. Maki and I really liked Nighthawks Diner while we were there.  Modern twists on classic diner foods.  And they had great desserts- I had a banana cream pie that had powdered parsley on it, which brightly highlighted the piping of the whipped cream on top.
post edited by abe_froeman - 2018/08/16 16:30:11
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