Southern Food & Trauma Tourism: An Interview with Michael W. Twitty

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scrumptiouschef
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2019/10/03 16:35:37 (permalink)

Southern Food & Trauma Tourism: An Interview with Michael W. Twitty

https://statesider.us/southern-food-trauma-tourism-michael-w-twitty/
 
 
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    HollyDolly
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    Re: Southern Food & Trauma Tourism: An Interview with Michael W. Twitty 2019/10/04 08:52:07 (permalink)
    Very interesting article.I've seen his book at the library, just haven't had a chance to check it out.My dad grew up in Hot Springs,Arkansas in the 1920s and early 30s. That was before they moved back to Milwaukee because grandma thought things might be better there. In regards to foods  and the African connection, I had heard of that in the past.My grandmother would make some things like okra, mustard greens, fried chicken ,etc. But she added them to her german cooking. I assume in her case she learned this from some of the white folk, the "hill folk ' as my dad refered to them. She might have even learned a few things from some black ladies too,for all I know.
    I think most of the white people who tour these plantations are southerners themselves, so of course their atitude to  conditions on the plantation in regards to blacks  is  something ingrained in them  since childhood, that's why they make the remarks they do. They often  didn't treat the poor whites any better either. Both blacks and whites worked as sharecroppers, and it was just another form of slavery for both.Though in the days of the plantations, the whites would be considered indentured servants. That's something no one talks about ,but it happend to whites who were debtors, poor, etc.
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