Helpful ReplyHot!Speaking of Food Memories

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mar52
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2018/02/25 20:54:42 (permalink)

Speaking of Food Memories

Back in the 50s when I was just a child my grandparents owned a small market and delicatessen in the Boyle Heights suburb of Los Angeles.  Boyle Heights had a large Jewish community and my grandfather who I called Pa sliced lox by hand.  He ordered his lox by the side.
 
Every Sunday morning he'd come to our house carrying a bag with bagels, lox, cod fish and whitefish chubs.  Our Sunday breakfasts with my grandfather are a wonderful memory.
 
But he also would bring a special treat just for me when he had enough of them.  They are something that I haven't been able to find since hand slicing became a thing of the past.
 
LOX WINGS!
 
LOX COLLARS!
 
Can you picture this kid who doesn't like touching her food eating greasy lox wings and collars?  WHAT A TREAT!
 
Wish I could buy them again.  I found one place online that has the wings, but they won't ship them to me. 
 
Sliced lox doesn't come close to the flavor of wings and collars.
 
I bet most of you never had them. 
 
What are your childhood food memories?
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BuddyRoadhouse
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/25 22:13:35 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby mar52 2018/02/25 22:21:57
Most of my memories are of massive family gatherings in my Grandparent's small apartments. Grand spreads of peasant food filled the long dining room table, all of it shared in cramped, noisy, overheated surroundings.  It was fantastic!
 
I remember my Dad's Mother making Blintzes from scratch.  I never liked the cheese filling as a kid, but I liked the ultra-delicate pancakes.  So she'd set me up with a stack of them and some strawberry jelly to shmear.  It was heaven.  I'm sure she was a good cook, but I didn't appreciate her food choices as much as those of my maternal Grandmother.
 
To this day the family still talks about her Sweet & Sour Meatballs, Gedempte Chicken (chicken boiled or baked to within an inch of its existence), Tongue (the only meat that tastes you back!), and her signature Sweet & Sour Cabbage Borscht (She called it Kapusta) which I didn't fully appreciate until i was in my late teens or early twenties.
 
I was smart enough to ask her to teach me how to make the Borscht once I started to enjoy it.  Now I'm passing it on to my Daughters.  In fact, we're having a Cabbage Borscht Prep Party next month at abe_froeman's house.  Four giant soup pots all going at once (the stove gets so hot we melted one of the stove knobs last year), 20 pounds of Beef Shanks, eight heads of Cabbage, a mess o' Onions, Carrots, Canned Tomatoes, Brown Sugar and a couple dozen Lemons will come together the last week of March (date TBD) to make upwards of 20 gallons of Jewish ambrosia, some of which may actually get shared with other family members.
 
My advice to any young folks out there reading this: If you have a favorite food made by a still living Grandparent, insist on getting the recipe ASAP.  Take the time to learn it at their elbow.  You'll have the recipe and the invaluable memory of the time you spent together making it.  I have a first cousin who missed the boat on getting the recipe for those Sweet & Sour Meatballs.  She's tried countless times to recreate it with varying degrees of success.  I reckon as long as she keeps trying, I'll keep tasting until she gets it right.
 
Buddy
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mar52
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/25 22:33:09 (permalink)
Buddy, my mother bade blintzes from scratch.  She had a special pan she used for the bletlachs (crepes) that somehow got lost when they moved to a new house.  Once frozen blintzes became a thing in our markets she never made them again.
 
My grandmother could make a gedempte chicken that always fell off the bone.  She put paprika on everything!
 
I only had one set of grandparents because they came to America before The War.  I lost them in my teens and you're so right about learning how to cook their recipes.  My father was a Survivor.
 
My grandfather made potato vereniki and served fried smelts to me.  He was a chef in Chicago hotels in the twenties.  The only thing he taught me about cooking which I never followed was he made salad dressing in the serving bowl.  He dressed the bowl and then added the lettuce.
 
I love food memories.
 
The unhatched egg yolks in soup always make me smile.
 
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BuddyRoadhouse
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/26 03:03:40 (permalink)
mar52
 
My grandmother could make a gedempte chicken that always fell off the bone.


If it didn't fall off the bone, it wasn't gedempte.  That's the very definition of the dish.
 
Your Grandfather was ahead of his time with his salad dressing method.  All the cooking shows I see on TV dress the bowl, add lettuce and toss.  Who knew we were doing it the wrong way all these years?
 
Buddy
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the grillman
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/26 13:19:27 (permalink)
Several I can recall….
 
My maternal grandmother used to make waffles for us for supper in an old cast iron waffle maker; serve them with Karo syrup and real butter, and homemade pork sausage from hogs they butchered themselves.   The same hog yielded wonderful slow roasted pork and gravy; all cooked in a cast iron Dutch oven.  From the orchard, she would make wonderful apple dumplings, black walnut ice cream that my grand dad would crank, gooseberry and blackberry pies.  The best crisp oatmeal cookies ever….    Homemade smoked kielbasa and sauerkraut and dumplings.    Hamburgers were served between two pieces of white bread, no reason to spend extra money on buns.   My grand dad would bring in fresh produce from the garden, he’d clean up some early green onion and radishes, which we’d sprinkle with salt and eat on the spot.  We’d wash it down with Stag beer from the pony keg in the old fridge in the detached garage…. yep, even at 10-11 years old, time to drink beer.   German heritage allowed that.  Mowing his lawn as a teenager was always a chore I didn’t mind over there, as I got beer afterwards.    My grandad’s specialty was barbecued chicken, cooked on the bone, over a slow hardwood fire.   They had one of those old brick fireplace/grill type things, popular in the 50’s.   He also presided at family fish fries with catfish he and I caught out of the Mississippi; he had a commercial fishing license.   I cleaned so much of the catch as a teen that I can’t stand to clean fish today; I still love fishing, catching, and eating, but cleaning?  Not so much. 
 
His mom, my great grandmother, always wanted us to bring back a big carp; she would bake it whole, with a tomato sauce; kind of a Creole treatment.  Made no sense I could remember, given our German roots.   She also always had a jar of homemade fig cookies or coconut cookies handy for the kids.  
 
My paternal grandmother had a special family meatloaf recipe that we all loved; wish I could find it.  She served it often, with green beans and baked potatoes, and red jello with fruit cocktail in it.  Strange what you recall…she also made wonderful lentil soup; great on a winter day.  She also made wonderful German Christmas cookies…. lebkuchen, springerles, gingerbread.    My grand dad’s nightly treat was a dish of vanilla ice cream with chocolate sauce, with some dry cornflakes sprinkled on top for crunch. 
 
My mom didn’t do as much country cooking as her mom, but she could make a mean sausage gravy for special breakfasts.   She specialized in chicken dishes, tuna casserole, and succulent beef stew.   Also wonderful homemade cloverleaf rolls and pumpkin bread.    My dad was a great hunter, and she always found a way to cook up whatever he brought home, venison, boar, bear, quail, rabbit, duck, and goose.  
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mar52
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/26 13:41:41 (permalink)
Excellent!  I love these stories.  A lot of our heritage is just something we talk about now and it's not reflected in our cooking.  Those recipes weren't written down and we didn't learn them.
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BuddyRoadhouse
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/26 14:39:10 (permalink)
grillman, your last sentence caught my eye, especially the mention of bear.  Can you describe the appearance, flavor, and texture?
 
Buddy
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/26 15:37:28 (permalink)
My grandfather lived in rural upper east Tennessee very close to Cumberland Gap, TN.  He had a 200+ acre farm and they truly lived off the farm except for some staples.  They grew corn, wheat, huge veggie gardens, had cows and chickens.  And they also had pigs which brings me to this story which is true.  Each Thanksgiving they killed pigs and usually it was about four.  I was very young and it was a gruesome event.  The neighbors helped and they strung the pigs up and scraped them and butchered them.  I recall them cutting the belly fat and skins and putting the huge amount into a huge pot and boiling it down and collecting the fried skins and collecting the lard which they put in pails.  The ladies would then make sausage and can it along with pork chops and fry up some pork chops while the men would salt the hams.
 
Now we get to the good park of the story.  While the ladies would be in the house doing all the preparations, I kept noticing the men walking to the spring house and returning a few minutes later with a cup of something????  While they were there they would cut off small slivers of last years cured ham and enjoy it with whatever was in their cup.
 
 I found out years later after my grandfathers death and we were clearing his home for Goodwill, we discovered under his brass bed a fine woven wool rug covered a trap door.   We opened the trap door and discovered plastic covering several five gallon wood barrels.  My grandfather had been a church goer for the last thirty years and too our knowledge he had not imbibed at least that long and maybe longer.  We sorta guessed what it was because of my grandfathers history.  They did more with corn and molasses besides make cornbread.  Grandfather had several good size springs on the property and he and his neighbors made lotsa home made liquor (moonshine).  We tapped the keg and the moonshine that had been in the barrel for some many years had turned a dark color?  Tannin?.  It had aged well.  His friend Tivas was still alive and apparently we guessed help prepare the brew.  We called Tivas down and tapped the keg again and Tivas brought some of his cured country ham down that was a year old and we sat beside the spring house, had raw aged ham and had enough of the moonshine to intoxicate many more folks than us.
 
Does this qualify as a childhood memory or as an adult memory?  This is a very true story.  This was true corn liquor aged very well.  How old?  I do not know but I guess in excess of 30 years.
 
Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN
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steve9570
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/26 15:44:17 (permalink)
mar52   I just saw your post. I love lox wings! There is a Russian market in the next town from me (Framingham Ma) that sells them for less than $2.00 lb . They are so light you get a lot in a pound. I have not been to the store in a while but plan on going soon. They also sell the tons of smoked fish and meats. 
Steve  Natick MA.
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phlmaestro
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/26 15:46:07 (permalink)
I've heard similar stories about my great-grandmother's weekly brunches. One of her specialties was a lox, egg and onion dish that she called Fried Lox. I still make it occasionally for family gatherings, although I know I don't do it as well as my great-grandmother did.
 
It's all about getting everything well-done. The chopped onions have to be turning brown before you add the lox, which have been dipped in flour after soaking in milk for about 20 minutes, to the pan. Then when the lox start to brown, you add a few eggs and keep frying until the eggs are also well done.  That's how the family liked it and they have a habit of telling me to keep it in the pan longer on those occasions when I still make it.
 
By the way .... I've been eating lox and other smoked fish with bagels my entire life, but I've never heard of lox wings.
My favorite smoked fish is kippered - or hot smoked and baked - salmon.
post edited by phlmaestro - 2018/02/26 17:15:27
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Michael Hoffman
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/26 16:14:19 (permalink)
My grandmother often made lox and eggs. But she scrambled the eggs with the lox and chopped raw onions in it. About once a year I'll remember that and make it myself. And, as I am now remembering I guess it will be breakfast tomorrow.
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leethebard
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/26 16:52:38 (permalink)
the grillman
Several I can recall….
 
My maternal grandmother used to make waffles for us for supper in an old cast iron waffle maker; serve them with Karo syrup and real butter, and homemade pork sausage from hogs they butchered themselves.   The same hog yielded wonderful slow roasted pork and gravy; all cooked in a cast iron Dutch oven.  From the orchard, she would make wonderful apple dumplings, black walnut ice cream that my grand dad would crank, gooseberry and blackberry pies.  The best crisp oatmeal cookies ever….    Homemade smoked kielbasa and sauerkraut and dumplings.    Hamburgers were served between two pieces of white bread, no reason to spend extra money on buns.   My grand dad would bring in fresh produce from the garden, he’d clean up some early green onion and radishes, which we’d sprinkle with salt and eat on the spot.  We’d wash it down with Stag beer from the pony keg in the old fridge in the detached garage…. yep, even at 10-11 years old, time to drink beer.   German heritage allowed that.  Mowing his lawn as a teenager was always a chore I didn’t mind over there, as I got beer afterwards.    My grandad’s specialty was barbecued chicken, cooked on the bone, over a slow hardwood fire.   They had one of those old brick fireplace/grill type things, popular in the 50’s.   He also presided at family fish fries with catfish he and I caught out of the Mississippi; he had a commercial fishing license.   I cleaned so much of the catch as a teen that I can’t stand to clean fish today; I still love fishing, catching, and eating, but cleaning?  Not so much. 
 
His mom, my great grandmother, always wanted us to bring back a big carp; she would bake it whole, with a tomato sauce; kind of a Creole treatment.  Made no sense I could remember, given our German roots.   She also always had a jar of homemade fig cookies or coconut cookies handy for the kids.  
 
My paternal grandmother had a special family meatloaf recipe that we all loved; wish I could find it.  She served it often, with green beans and baked potatoes, and red jello with fruit cocktail in it.  Strange what you recall…she also made wonderful lentil soup; great on a winter day.  She also made wonderful German Christmas cookies…. lebkuchen, springerles, gingerbread.    My grand dad’s nightly treat was a dish of vanilla ice cream with chocolate sauce, with some dry cornflakes sprinkled on top for crunch. 
 
My mom didn’t do as much country cooking as her mom, but she could make a mean sausage gravy for special breakfasts.   She specialized in chicken dishes, tuna casserole, and succulent beef stew.   Also wonderful homemade cloverleaf rolls and pumpkin bread.    My dad was a great hunter, and she always found a way to cook up whatever he brought home, venison, boar, bear, quail, rabbit, duck, and goose.  


What great food memories. You were one very lucky young man!!
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the grillman
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/26 17:38:33 (permalink)
It's been a while, but I have been fortunate enough to have friends and family who also big game hunt occasionally...I pretty much just bird hunt only, I don't hunt anything that can bite me back....but I digress.....
 
Bear meat is has the grainy texture of beef or buffalo, IMO.  It's a red meat, darker, like venison.  I mostly have had stews and roasts....it's fairly strong with a sweet taste, verging towards the gamey, but that's my experience.   All game is a product of what it consumes.   These bears, he shot a few, came from the Tennessee mountains.   They probably weren't eating berries and sweet fruits to make the meat more palatable, but scavenging, like most bears.  I have read in outdoor magazines that many coastal Alaskan bears are almost inedible, as they subside on fish much of the time. 
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the grillman
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/26 17:42:24 (permalink)
Thank you, I always thought so.   Family gatherings and lotsa food were pretty important growing up!
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BuddyRoadhouse
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/26 18:23:54 (permalink)
the grillman
...I have read in outdoor magazines that many coastal Alaskan bears are almost inedible, as they subside on fish much of the time. 



That's what spurred the question.  I've read that the meat of most animals with a carnivorous based diet tastes pretty terrible.  I reckon bears fall more into the omnivore category, but I gotta think they'd rather eat meat whenever possible.  As you say though, it's probably a regional thing based on what foostuffs are available.
 
Buddy
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Michael Hoffman
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/26 19:24:27 (permalink)
BuddyRoadhouse
the grillman
...I have read in outdoor magazines that many coastal Alaskan bears are almost inedible, as they subside on fish much of the time. 



That's what spurred the question.  I've read that the meat of most animals with a carnivorous based diet tastes pretty terrible.  I reckon bears fall more into the omnivore category, but I gotta think they'd rather eat meat whenever possible.  As you say though, it's probably a regional thing based on what foostuffs are available.
 
Buddy


I happen to be quite fond of bear meat. With bear meat the most important first step is to remove the fat. If you don't get it all when butchering the bear you'd better make sure you get it before cooking. Put simply, bear fat is vile. Black bear meat is very much like older venison, or even mutton. Brown bear meat is, I think, tastier than the meat from black bears, but as the grillman mentioned when they've been fattening up on salmon their meat does tend to be a little different.
 
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the grillman
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/26 21:40:11 (permalink)
Well, I bet this is the most in-depth discussion of bear meat on this forum, ever!   Off-Road food, indeed.
 
next week, possum and sweet taters.  
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leethebard
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/26 21:51:02 (permalink)

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felix4067
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/26 22:47:27 (permalink)
I don't really have much in the way of food memories, at least not in the way of traditional foods or holidays or whatever. But what I do have is a solid base of "we were really poor, so we grew, hunted, fished, or bartered for most things we needed."
 
If it would grow in Michigan, we grew it. Our garden was 75 feet by 175 feet, full of every conceivable vegetable. We also had fruit: apples, pears, peaches, concord grapes, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, and strawberries. Every spring we'd spend a month living in the woods to pick mushrooms: morels, mostly, but also all the other edible ones that come up at the same time. Everything we grew or found in nature would get dried, frozen, or canned to last through the winter. Dad always got both a buck and a doe permit every fall, and almost never did he not get both. We had rabbit, pheasant, squirrel, partridge, turkey, and quail. Friends of ours raised chickens, so in exchange for helping butcher and process we'd get some. One memorable year my dad ended up getting two live geese, which we kept for about a month before he slaughtered them. We made our own jams and jellies, and I was in 5th grade before I learned you could buy cookies at the store.
 
I do have a couple of food memories from my maternal grandmother! Every holiday, she made what we always called Grandma Unrath Salad. Just a tossed salad, really, but the method is what makes it special. I still make it more often than not on holidays. She also used to pickle EVERYTHING. Cucumbers, sure. But also pears, apples, peaches, zucchini, tomatoes, green beans, carrots, and apricots.
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mar52
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/26 23:52:49 (permalink)
$2 a pound for lox wings?  Steve9570.. nice to meet you!  Well sort of meet you.
 
I'm totally loving these stories.  My grandmother had chickens on her farm.  We called it the farm.  It had a chicken coop and she had a few chickens.  Those eggs were the best I've ever tasted.
 
That's the chicken coop in the back.  It was big.  I wasn't.
 

 
 
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/27 08:07:50 (permalink)
BuddyRoadhouse
I've read that the meat of most animals with a carnivorous based diet tastes pretty terrible.

There's also an increased risk of trichinosis, so meat from a wild carnivore/omnivore should be cooked thoroughly.  IIRC something like the most recent 60-some cases of trichinosis in the US were traced to improperly cooked bear, so pass on the Yogi Tartare!
 
Neat photo, Mar.  Did your grandmother live in rural California?
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leethebard
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/27 08:16:07 (permalink)
mar52
$2 a pound for lox wings?  Steve9570.. nice to meet you!  Well sort of meet you.
 
I'm totally loving these stories.  My grandmother had chickens on her farm.  We called it the farm.  It had a chicken coop and she had a few chickens.  Those eggs were the best I've ever tasted.
 
That's the chicken coop in the back.  It was big.  I wasn't.
 

 
 


What a beautiful memory. Love this thread.
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steve9570
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/27 09:15:27 (permalink)
Nice thread indeed.   I know I must be old now I can remember being able to get warm meat kinishes in Boston where I grew up for 25 cents  now at the local store delis they go for $1.50 each!!  old and cold.
Got to get those lox wings this weekend! Some dark rye and butter and I will be all set.
 
Steve  
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/27 10:16:06 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby MissK 2018/03/04 05:32:27
   Being born in the 50’s on the East coast was fun for a kid. It was nothing but hard work for our parents. I look back at how hard my Mom worked raising three kids cooking three squares a day and shopping for everything within five blocks of our house. We knew when the fresh bread was coming out of the oven at the local bakery. I heard many times when going to the bakery early. You’ll have to wait if you want the rye bread sliced it's still hot. We also always bought two loaves of Italian bread still warm right from the oven when Mom made her Sunday spaghetti sauce. One loaf was for dipping in the sauce while waiting for dinner. I remember us all telling Mom we needed to taste the sauce to make sure it was done. We all sat around the table eating as a family. I remember Mom taking me down the street to buy  fresh killed chicken. There was always a few feathers left of the wings and legs that needed to be burned off on the gas stove burner flame. Mom would simmer the chicken in some water, celery and onions till about half way cooked. She would then put the chicken in the oven and roast it for the main course. The broth was served steaming hot in bowls along with a bowl of cold egg noodles to put into your soup to cool it down. My Mom was a great cook, if she was sill alive I’d be the Chef in her everything homemade restaurant. I can’t remember one meal that wasn’t good. You never had to call us kids twice to the dinner table. We would come home to a pot of simmering stuffed cabbage, Meatloaf made from the fresh ground beef right from the butchers grinder. My Dad was in charge of the fried burgers. He would say I’m ready to cook someone go to the store across the street and get some ground chuck. Life was simple, I didn’t realize until later in life that everyone didn’t eat like this. We couldn’t afford to eat in restaurants. As teens we stopped for a few fried hotdogs, Lobster rolls, or even a few Stuffed and baked clams topped with cocktail sauce to eat on our way home from the boys club.

   Looking back “ We were the lucky ones” We lived in a time that there was no waste. The Easter Ham after everyone was tired of Ham dinners and sandwiches, was put through the grinder with dill pickles mixed with Mayo for ham and pickle sandwiches on Wonder bread. I could still smell the apple cider coming from the presses at the orchards in the Fall, the homemade stews and roasts of winter and the cool pitcher of lemonade sitting in the cooler after a hard day of playing baseball. Being born in the inner-city probably wasn’t viewed as great outdoor living. We grew up with having twelve to eighteen kids within a few blocks to start a baseball game. We always had the Boys club a few blocks away to have basketball games, pingpong and swimming “Naked” in the pool. I remember a small crack in the window and hearing the girls giggling as the boys lined up naked waiting to jump into the pool. 
   Pizza in Connecticut was something to look forward to. We had some of the best around made with the best ingredients. There was never any leftover pizza. I enjoyed growing up in a area that was full of different nationalities. The old world ways and foods that were offered were like living in Europe. There wasn’t a nationality from Europe that wasn’t represented. 
   I saw a saying yesterday “ One life, One opportunity” I look back and see how true this was. I also wonder and realize that just one wrong turn could have changed my whole life. I now know when I thought everything looked bad it was just a sign to step up and make things better. 
   We didn’t grow up looking out our window at wildflowers and meadows. We grew up playing in city parks and playing ball on cement. We learned right from wrong from each other. The wrong way always hurt a bit more than the right way. This is the way you built your character and integrity in life. Every decision I made in life came from what I learned on the streets. It’s nice to be at this point in life feeling I wouldn’t have changed a thing. 
  I was going to just come in at tell Mar it was a good thread. I guess I got carried away.....
   
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leethebard
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/27 10:55:34 (permalink)
Oh, God Pnwchef,my memories almost are a copy. I grew up in Union City . I was born in the forties,the very first of the baby boomers. We were 100% Italian,my parents being first generation. Mom probably considered it a mortal sin if she didn't cook a complete meal from scratch,different everyday of the month,except of course for Sunday pasta. We had an Italian bread store where we purchased fresh from the oven bread. ..just 3 blocks away.The end(the Gooley!) usually disappeared before I got home with it. Mom took me too to the chicken store where the chickens cackled in crates...the older birds for soup. I watched the slaughtering process, and mom said I didn't eat chicken for years after that!!Butcher Bauer was three "doors" down from us, for fresh meat,often chop meat(So much could be made from that,especially mom's dynamite meatballs)Bennies was down the corner, an old fashioned grocery store. Mom often sent me there for ten cents worth of soup greens. For my dime I got a few carrots,,celery,potato and such!
     You reminded me of the fact everything was so close to us, and in the 50's it was ok for this young guy to walk the streets ,shopping for mom.  We also went to two pastry shops,but only on Sundays,one "Fischbacks" was for their crumb cake, and the trip to DiBari's in Hoboken was for Italian pastry.(Man does not live by bread alone,even if it's fresh baked Italian!) It was a time when mom searched for nrw recipes, and we ate so many varieties of food, not just Italian.
     Sunday was often with my Grandparents, my mom's who lived "downstairs" from us, or my dad's who lived an hour or so away in New Brunswick(always pasta of course). I can still taste my Dad's mom's veal cutlets.Always had another course after the pasta!
  Of course we had a milkman who delivered fresh milk, at first just pasteurized, so it had to be shaken first. We had an egg shop for fresh eggs.
      For treats we had two Ice Cream parlors that so smelled of vanilla, and a Lofts candy shop, and "Angies" down the block for soda fountain made soda...and rickies (soda syrup in tap water)
      Life was simple,money was tight,but it was a great time to be growing up...and oh to play one more game of stick ball in the street. I covered 2nd base, the manhole cover!
      
 
 
 
#25
Michael Hoffman
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/27 10:58:11 (permalink)
the grillman
Well, I bet this is the most in-depth discussion of bear meat on this forum, ever!   Off-Road food, indeed.
 
next week, possum and sweet taters.  


Don't forget the collards. Oh, and I like to have cornbread with it, too. By the way, roast whistlepig is great with the sweet potatoes, collards and cornbread, too.
 
#26
mar52
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/27 11:13:27 (permalink)
Getting carried away in a thread is great, Bill!
 
My grandparents' home we called the farm because of the chicken coop and the neighbors had horses.  Loved feeling carrots to the horses!
 
Their home was in Altadena, California which is adjacent to Pasadena and just down the block from where JPL now resides.  Watching JPL grow was amazing.  It was real life science fiction growing up right in front of you.  Their home was a California Bungalow and us kids thought it was HUGE.  The property was on what they called a commercial acre on a street of other homes and it had a rent house and another single room house on the property....  and a small pond with giant goldfish!
 
Can't forget the hear my palms were black for months because I helped my grandmother shell walnuts.  Lots of fun times there.
 
My brother and I took our friend, Richard there years later when it was for sale and we could get in to show him what a large house it was with this large room where we all ate at a huge table.
 
It wasn't.  It was a small 3 bedroom and 2 bathroom house that seemed larger than life to us when we were kids.
 
 
#27
1bbqboy
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/27 11:29:11 (permalink)
Did you go to Altadena Dairy when you were out there?
#28
pnwchef
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/27 11:58:49 (permalink)
leethebard Most people lived in the inner-city you needed to be rich to live in the berbs. Back then everything you needed to survive was within a 5 block radius. Bars, pizza joints, hotdog stands, movie theaters, pharmacies, meat markets, bakeries, bike shops, shoe stores........Whens the last time you got new heels on your shoes ??????
 
 
Mar, I bet you'll wind up with enough to write a book of memories. Wait until Michael Hoffman tells his stories about sitting around the camp fire in the Lewis and Clark expedition. 
 
#29
leethebard
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Re: Speaking of Food Memories 2018/02/27 12:02:42 (permalink)
pnwchef
leethebard Most people lived in the inner-city you needed to be rich to live in the berbs. Back then everything you needed to survive was within a 5 block radius. Bars, pizza joints, hotdog stands, movie theaters, pharmacies, meat markets, bakeries, bike shops, shoe stores........Whens the last time you got new heels on your shoes ??????
 
 
Mar, I bet you'll wind up with enough to write a book of memories. Wait until Michael Hoffman tells his stories about sitting around the camp fire in the Lewis and Clark expedition. 
 


Did they visit Ye Old Waffle House?
#30
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