Helpful ReplyHot!Surviving "Duncan Hines Family" Restaurants

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Louis
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/10 21:51:07 (permalink)
In the Los Angeles area in 1923 The Sonora Restaurant opened.  In 1925 it was changed to the El Choro Cafe.  In 1927 it became El Choro's.  Within a few years the restaurant spawned a small chain of restaurants in the Los Angeles area.  One of these was (but is no longer) in Long Beach, California.  Duncan Hines dined here, writing, "First class, high-grade Mexican food is not "hot" unless you make it so with condiments.  This is one of the very few Mexican restaurants I can recommend.  The meals are NOT the usual kind. . . .  Ever hear of Albondiga soup, Almendrado frozen dessert?"
 
The chain now has six restaurants.  Some are better than others, as is the case with any chain, even a very small one.  The one at 11th and Western Avenue (1121 South Western Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90006), which is referred to as the "original," seems to be the one with the highest praise.  I'm sure the restaurant that Duncan Hines dined at in Long Beach is long gone, but the chain still serves some of the same recipes as they did in the 1920s, such as the Albondiga soup.   I'll let Jim decide whether to include this one or not.
 
http://elcholo.com/
 
post edited by Louis - 2016/05/10 22:01:46
mar52
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/10 22:13:53 (permalink)
Been to El Cholo time after time.  They even, prior to 911 had a spot inside the Delta terminal at LAX.  I found it ordinary (Ordinary does not mean bad)  but they had a clever gimmick that no other Mexican restaurant in Los Angeles copied. 
 
They sold Green Corn Tamales only a few months during the year.  Green Corn Tamales are sweet and quite good.  At first the corn used to make them was only available during those months.  Lster with freezing it was available all year round...  but they continued the tradition of only offering the tamales during a few months cinching crowded booths during those months. 
 
For something to do many years ago and totally strange and off the wall we went to the airport and dined at the airport location.  Mel Tillis was eating there at the same time.  We People Watched.  It used to be fun watching people that were late for their planes.
 
The Western Avenue location is my favorite.  The margaritas are sweet and large!  It's still going strong.
ThanksfortheCrepes
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/11 06:35:47 (permalink)
The King's Inn is out of the running for Highland, NC. It no longer exists, but here is a nostalgic link to it's history for any who may be interested. I hope my next contribution will be about a still extant restaurant with a long history in North Carolina. Thanks @WarToad for the helpful online text from 1959.
WarToad
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/11 07:55:31 (permalink)
#Goosebumps 4 /eLove!
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/11 17:20:34 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby JRPfeff 2016/05/11 18:45:34
I'd like to chime in on two restaurants that I eat at often.
 
The Golden Lamb in Lebanon OH is the oldest hotel in OH (est. 1803). It has been run by the family of Sen. Rob Portman since 1927, but has been leased or managed by others over the past few decades. It is currently managed by the Phoenix Restaurant Group. They tried to make the Golden Lamb restaurant more of a fine dining experience, but that didn't go over well with the established customer base, so they have brought back old favorites, like the relish plate, and traditional turkey and fried chicken dinners, while keeping some fine dining options. The prices went up significantly, but that was to be expected. The food is still decent, but perhaps not "destination-worthy". The hotel rooms, if not occupied, are open for visitors to see. The history of the place is the attraction, and still worth the visit to Lebanon.
 
I have visited The Beaumont Inn in Harrodsburg KY numerous times over the last 20 years or so. I cannot imagine that it has changed much since Duncan Hines visited, except to add the Owl's Nest Lounge and Old Owl Tavern, which only enhance the experience. The menu in the main dining room is the classic old school Kentucky dining experience. I have never had a bad meal here, and the food has always been consistent. When dining here for the first time, you must try the Classic Beaumont Dinner, “Yellow-Legged” Fried Chicken & Two-Year-Old Kentucky-Cured Country Ham, which I'm sure Duncan Hines probably had occasion to try. And, apparently, they are the Proud Recipient of the 2015 James Beard Foundation’s America’s Classic Award.
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/11 18:15:22 (permalink)
soozycue520
I'd like to chime in on two restaurants that I eat at often.
 
The Golden Lamb in Lebanon OH is the oldest hotel in OH (est. 1803). It has been run by the family of Sen. Rob Portman since 1927, but has been leased or managed by others over the past few decades. It is currently managed by the Phoenix Restaurant Group. They tried to make the Golden Lamb restaurant more of a fine dining experience, but that didn't go over well with the established customer base, so they have brought back old favorites, like the relish plate, and traditional turkey and fried chicken dinners, while keeping some fine dining options. The prices went up significantly, but that was to be expected. The food is still decent, but perhaps not "destination-worthy". The hotel rooms, if not occupied, are open for visitors to see. The history of the place is the attraction, and still worth the visit to Lebanon.
 
I have visited The Beaumont Inn in Harrodsburg KY numerous times over the last 20 years or so. I cannot imagine that it has changed much since Duncan Hines visited, except to add the Owl's Nest Lounge and Old Owl Tavern, which only enhance the experience. The menu in the main dining room is the classic old school Kentucky dining experience. I have never had a bad meal here, and the food has always been consistent. When dining here for the first time, you must try the Classic Beaumont Dinner, “Yellow-Legged” Fried Chicken & Two-Year-Old Kentucky-Cured Country Ham, which I'm sure Duncan Hines probably had occasion to try. And, apparently, they are the Proud Recipient of the 2015 James Beard Foundation’s America’s Classic Award.




That's good to know. I plan to visit the Beaumont Inn in August
Louis
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/11 20:09:04 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby soozycue520 2016/05/11 21:21:05
The Beaumont Inn was Duncan Hines's favorite Kentucky restaurant.  He really liked the yellow-legged fried chicken and the two-year-old country ham.
 
By the way, the country ham comes from Meacham Country Hams in Sturgis, Kentucky, which is only a half-hour's drive from my house; the Beaumont Inn, by contrast, is about a four-hour drive for me.  I took Philmaestro to Meacham's back in September.
 
http://www.meachamhams.com/
 
post edited by Louis - 2016/05/11 20:11:43
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/11 20:47:39 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby soozycue520 2016/05/11 21:21:41
soozycue520
The Golden Lamb in Lebanon OH is the oldest hotel in OH (est. 1803). It has been run by the family of Sen. Rob Portman since 1927, but has been leased or managed by others over the past few decades. It is currently managed by the Phoenix Restaurant Group. They tried to make the Golden Lamb restaurant more of a fine dining experience, but that didn't go over well with the established customer base, so they have brought back old favorites, like the relish plate, and traditional turkey and fried chicken dinners, while keeping some fine dining options. The prices went up significantly, but that was to be expected. The food is still decent, but perhaps not "destination-worthy"

Thanks for the update.  I've only visited The Golden Lamb once and that was to tour the rooms, but the menu changes sound interesting enough to get my attention for my Lebanon trip this August.
Louis
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/11 20:59:35 (permalink)
This is a Duncan Hines recommended restaurant that is no longer a restaurant--but can operate like one for special events.  The place is Mattei's Tavern in Los Olivos, California, about 50 miles north of Santa Barbara.  It dates back to 1886.  Judging by an examination of their website, I'm not sure exactly what they do now.  Is it a restaurant when it wants to be?  There are accommodations, and you can dine there for special occasions, but why they are not a full-scale restaurant is beyond me.
 
http://www.matteistavern.com/
 
Louis
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/11 21:23:18 (permalink)
As best as I can tell, this is a former Duncan Hines recommended restaurant in Monterey, California, that was called Cademartori's.  It has gone through several changes of ownership over the years, and since 1992 has been Tarpy's Roadhouse.  Duncan Hines said in the 1940s that it was an Italian restaurant in an old adobe home.  From the pictures on the website, it looks like the "adobe" part has been retained.  I wonder if Duncan would recognize this place?  It looks like it has expanded quite a bit in the intervening 65+ years.  It looks like he might approve of it, though.  This is where someone who lives in this area can help.
 
http://tarpys.com/
 
 
post edited by Louis - 2016/05/11 21:25:33
Louis
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/11 21:49:12 (permalink)
The Trader Vic's restaurant that Duncan Hines frequented in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s moved six miles--from Oakland, California to Emeryville--in 1972.  It is still a world class operation, and locations are now found, not only in Emeryville, but all over the world.
 
http://tradervics.com/
 
post edited by Louis - 2016/05/11 21:55:10
rumaki
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/12 01:50:07 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby JRPfeff 2016/05/12 08:34:14
Getting back to Beaumont Inn for just a moment:
 
I have been going there since I was about 5 years old (late 1950s/early '60s).  
 
The Dedman family has run this as an inn since around 1917.  It's been the same family all that time, and they are wonderful people.  There was a period of time in the late 1980s- early 1990s when the inn foundered a bit, but the two most recent generations have revitalized it while still keeping the essentials intact. They are also very much involved in historic preservation in the Bluegrass. We consider those folks to be friends -- in the interest of full disclosure.
 
The Dedmans were instrumental in getting liquor by the drink approved in their county, so, as noted above, there's now the Owl's Nest and the Old Owl Tavern on the premises, and each is a terrific experience in its own way. They do wonderful fried chicken livers,  and I always have them when we arrive too late on our first night to have dinner in the dining room. One of the current generation owners does bourbon flights, and they have reestablished the Old Owl distillery which produces a boutique bourbon.
 
But I love the main dining room (where you can also get wine, beer and cocktails), in part because that was where I ate as a child. They have expanded the menu to include other "fine dining" options beyond their traditional chicken and ham, but I still have the chicken almost every time we go.  Although I did have some absolutely delicious fried oysters on a special one evening . . .
 
One of their signatures in the olden days was minted grapefruit juice as an appetizer. They stopped offering it to the general public for many years, but several years ago, when I was there on my birthday, my husband persuaded them (in advance) to make a batch just for us.  They did it again every other time we visited (roughly twice a year). We always elicited looks of surprise and envy from the other diners when the green-tinted beverage was delivered to our table, and ours alone.  Last year, they reintroduced it to the general menu, along with their famous individual tomato aspic rings filled with "seasoned" (with chopped black olives and green peppers) cottage cheese as a salad option, another longtime favorite of mine that had also disappeared for a while. 
 
Another classic that I am sure was served in Hines' time is frozen fruit salad with miniature country ham biscuits.  That's served at lunch and I believe Sunday brunch, and it is a delightful entree.
 
And of course, the corn meal batter cakes at breakfast and Sunday brunch are delectable, along with the superb bacon and country ham.
 
My only two slightly negative observations: I have never considered dessert to be Beaumont Inn's strong suit, though there are those who love the orange-lemon Robert E. Lee layer cake. My favorite olden days dessert used to be ice cream with strawberries or peaches served in a meringue shell -- I don't recall seeing that on the menu for a while.  They also eliminated their Huguenot torte -- not a big loss in my mind, but it certainly had its fans. 
 
The other one is that, in the olden days, they served fabulous biscuits with lunch and dinner. They still offer biscuits at breakfast, but at dinner they've taken to serving undistinguished dinner rolls that do not taste to me as if they are made on-site.  And the breakfast biscuits don't taste the way I remember them, although the Dedmans swear the recipe is the same.  They still make wonderful yeast rolls and corn muffins (the latter baked in cast iron tins) for Sunday brunch and possibly at weekday lunch, as well. These are exactly as I recall them from my childhood.  The yeast rolls are so redolent with yeast that I swear they are intoxicating, and they are light as a feather.
 
If you stay as an overnight guest -- which, by the way, is the only way you can have breakfast there -- you can stay in the main inn (which was a girls' boarding school in the 19th and early 20th century), Goddard Hall (across the drive from the main inn, which is where my family always stayed, because some of the rooms had balconies which we would sit out on in the afternoons and play board games), and Greystone House, the former family mansion with spacious rooms and suites.  We generally stay in the main inn nowadays, but each option has its merits and it is worth inquiring about if you want to stay overnight to figure out which appeals to you. There is a swimming pool in season, a small but nicely landscaped walking trail, and outdoor shuffleboard.
 
For many, many years they had bingo in the twin parlors in the main inn on Saturday evenings, limited to house guests. The prizes were items like decorative paper napkins or other small nicknacks from the inn's gift shop, and if you won one, you selected yours by plucking a gift-wrapped package from a big basket -- so it was always a surprise.  In the olden days they had separate baskets for adults and children, but by the time we started going there again in the 1980s after a long hiatus, they seemed to have reduced it to just one basket. The grand prize -- which I won a couple of times, including one year I was there on my actual birthday -- was usually a choice between a bottle of wine or a big carton of Mom Beckman's Pull Candy. Sadly, the elderly "bingo lady," a local who had run the bingo evening forever, passed away a few years ago, and it has not been reinstated. 
 
As you can tell, I love Beaumont Inn. I think they've done a brilliant job in evolving with the times to thrive yet still maintain the tradition and spirit of the place.  I am sure Duncan Hines would approve!
 
 
 
 
 
 
post edited by rumaki - 2016/05/12 02:05:01
wanderingjew
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/12 08:00:33 (permalink)
Thanks Rumaki

Now I'm looking forward to visiting the Beaumont Inn even more. Although I don't exactly have my schedule, based on logistics it will likely be on a Friday or Saturday evening. I won't be staying overnight as I'll likely be driving back to Louisville afterwards. I already know I'll be having the country ham.
rumaki
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/12 08:56:44 (permalink)
WJ:
 
You can do the drive back to Louisville in about 90 minutes, give or take, depending on the traffic.  Make a reservation if you are going to dine on Friday or Saturday night -- they do fill up on the weekends.
 
I hope haven't oversold it!
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/12 10:15:36 (permalink)
rumaki
WJ:
 
You can do the drive back to Louisville in about 90 minutes, give or take, depending on the traffic.  Make a reservation if you are going to dine on Friday or Saturday night -- they do fill up on the weekends.
 
I hope haven't oversold it!




Unlike my first part of the trip where I'll be sticking around mostly within an hour's drive of Indianapolis, I'll be all over Kentucky. I've done the Churchill Downs and Louisville Slugger factor tour in Louisville, so my time in Louisville will be limited but I do plan to get a lot of roadfood in town. I'll likely spend one day in Bardstown, and visit one of the distilleries in the area and then Abe Lincoln's birthplace,  I've never been to Lexington and will likely be there for the day when I visit the Beaumont Inn. I would like to do one of the horse farm tours and the Mary Todd Lincoln House. And then then spend one day in Owensboro (I'll probably spend the night there) and re-visit the Bluegrass Museum.
Louis
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/12 21:05:27 (permalink)
This one is a little different.  In his 1941 guidebook, Duncan Hines wrote of the Allied Arts Guild in Palo Alto, California, "Operated by Auxiliary for Stanford Convalescent Home for Children.  A place I want you to visit even if not dining there, for it is one of the beauty spots of the state.  A series of fine specialty shops display antiques and beautiful articles made on the premises."  Allied Arts Guild still has a cafe to grab a bite to eat, but as the website will attest, what Hines wrote still holds true today.  This is one place he most definitely would recognize.
 
http://www.alliedartsguild.org/
 
And this is the website for the restaurant that is there today, the Blue Garden Cafe.
 
http://bluegardencafe.com/#!/page_main
 
post edited by Louis - 2016/05/12 21:10:13
Louis
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/12 21:19:12 (permalink)
Once upon a time, in the 1930s and 1940s, the La Venta Inn in Palos Verdes Estate, California was a Duncan Hines recommended restaurant.  Now it is a place to have a wedding or a special event.  I sure would have liked to have dined here!  I'll bet you wish you could have dined here, too!
 
http://www.laventa.com/
 
Louis
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/12 21:41:42 (permalink)
Of the Huntington Hotel in Pasadena, California, Duncan Hines wrote, "Once again I am glad to recommend this to those who appreciate dining delectably in a beautiful atmosphere. . . . Allow plenty of time to dine and to stroll around the grounds of this hotel.  I always go here for one or more meals when I make my annual trip to the West Coast."
 
The Huntington Hotel is now called the Langham Huntington Hotel, and they have five restaurants inside; the Tap Room has been there since the 1930s, but I'm not sure about the others.
 
http://www.langhamhotels.com/en/the-langham/pasadena/
 
post edited by Louis - 2016/05/13 00:08:03
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/12 22:05:39 (permalink)
The Huntington is a lovely place.  I've been to a wedding there and to one of their Sunday Brunches.  You can feel the history.
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/13 17:34:44 (permalink)

 With its views of Lake Monona and the State Capital, Nob Hill in Madison, Wisconsin was a destination restaurant when I was growing up. Nob Hill was listed in the 1959 edition of Adventures in Good Eating.
 
Some time in the 1970's or 80's the restaurant hit hard times and went out of business. The location now houses the state teachers union.
 
All that remains of the Nob Hill Restaurant today is my father's bowling shirt.
post edited by JRPfeff - 2016/05/13 17:36:41
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/14 03:34:54 (permalink)
Here's an article about a DH recommended restaurant that now seems defunct, but perhaps it might be of interest to some here. I, for one, would have loved to have eaten there in Asheville in its heyday.
post edited by ThanksfortheCrepes - 2016/05/14 03:57:44
ThanksfortheCrepes
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/14 04:16:05 (permalink)
Okay, I found a great one that seems to exist still in Bryson City in NC!
 
It's still both a small hotel and restaurant and sounds up to the quality it was when DH visited. He must have been an amazing individual to have ferreted out all these great places before the internet and before even good roads. I am in complete awe.
 
Here's their website, and here are some glowing reviews and great photos from the Trip Advisor site.
 
Thanks, JRPfeff for starting this interesting thread, and thanks WarToad, for the online link.
 
 
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/14 19:10:29 (permalink)
Don's Seafood & Steak House in Lafayette, LA (listed in the 1959 guide, and in operation since 1934) is still open. They now have multiple locations in Lafayette, but I have never been to the original restaurant downtown. I have never had a bad meal (or a great meal) at the Johnston St. location. The other two Lafayette restaurants listed in the 1959 guide (Jacob's and Toby's Oak Grove) are long gone.
 
Also, none of the Cincinnati, OH locations listed in the 1959 guide remain. I dined a couple of times at Shuller's Wigwam in the mid 90's, and it was clearly coasting on its reputation (or possibly just habit for its many elderly patrons) at that point. It was demolished not long after, and remains a vacant lot to this day. Lenhardt's is a more recent closure and demolition; I only ate there once in the early 00's, and my opinion of it was pretty much the same as Shuller's.
 
Finally, I believe the 1809 Room at Miami University in Oxford, OH closed a few years ago. I ate there once as a student over 20 years ago, and I only remember that it was miles ahead of the cafeteria.
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/14 20:12:37 (permalink)
The current verified count is 131 surviving Duncan Hines Recommended restaurants.
 
I also dumped all of the Chicago restaurants from the 1959 book onto the list. I'm trying a new way of adding restaurants, put them up first, then verify their existence later. It may be easier for me this way. If there is no link, I have not verified the restaurant is still in operation. I'll sift through the Chicago places in the next couple of days.
 
UPDATE - I am adding links where I find them for Chicago restaurants and crossing through the text where I come up empty. If you have any local knowledge of the Windy City, please provide corrections.
post edited by JRPfeff - 2016/05/14 22:34:20
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/15 12:50:15 (permalink)
I am done with Chicago. I placed the entire list from the 1959 edition in a post below. If you find any mistakes, please let me know. Fun fact - the Duncan Hines recommended Ong Luk Yun Restaurant was located where "The Picasso" now resides.
 
Now on to New York City.
 
Same thing goes, I'm putting everything from the 1959 book on the list. If there is no link, I have not verified the restaurant is still in operation. If it looks long gone, I will strike-through the text. I'll sift through the NYC places in the next couple of days.
 
UPDATE - I'm through a couple dozen restaurants in NYC with surprisingly few hits. I was expecting most of the hoity-toity French places to be gone, but in most cases there is no new restaurant filling those spaces.
post edited by JRPfeff - 2016/05/16 17:31:07
rumaki
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/15 14:26:02 (permalink)
JRPfeff:
 
Just a note about one of the remaining restaurants in Chicago, the Kungsholm.  I notice the Lawry's site that you link to does pay lip service to the legendary puppet theatre that was in that original restaurant.  I remember going twice - once as a grade schooler with my family when we took a trip to Chicago from Indianapolis by train between Christmas and New Year, and once with my Girl Scout troop for a weekend visit, probably in about 1966. I also went once in college on a double date, after it had ceased to be the Kungsholm.
 
I don't remember much about the food apart that it was a lavish "Swedish" smorgasbord.  I remember having ladled some kind of creamed fish on a plate which the waiter took away before I had a chance to eat it.
 
I do remember the puppet theater vividly -- saw "Aida" once, and "Madame Butterfly" the second time I went.  It was an amazing experience.   http://chicagotonight.wtt...011/12/29/puppet-opera
 
I doubt that the Lawry's on that site bears any resemblance to the Kungsholm Hines knew, though it may be quite good in its own right.
 
Here's a link to a Kungsholm menu from 1952.  http://www.encyclopedia.c...y.org/pages/11589.html
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/16 17:29:05 (permalink)
Here's the list of Chicago restaurants from the 1959 edition. If I eliminated any that are still around, please let me know.
 
Illinois
  • Agostino's Restaurant. 7 E. Delaware PI.
  • Allgauer's Restaurant, Chicago
  • "The Anchorage" in the Windermere East Hotel, Chicago - NN
  • Atlantic Hotel. 316 S. Clark St.
  • Beverly Woods Restaurant, Chicago
  • Bismarck Hotel, Chicago - NN
  • A Bit of Sweden, Chicago - NN
  • Black Forest Restaurant. 2636 N. Clark St
  • The Buttery in Ambassador Hotel, Chicago - NN
  • Cafe Bonaparte, Chicago - NN
  • Carson Pirie Scott & Co. Tea Rooms. State and Madison Sts
  • Carson Pirie Scott Men's Grill, Monroe and Wabash
  • Chandelier Restaurant. 1931 Lincoln Park West
  • Charm House. 1400 Lake Shore Dr
  • Chef Alberto's Restaurant, Chicago - NN
  • Chez Paree. 610 Fairbanks Court
  • Chez Paul. 180 E. Delaware Place
  • Citro's. 181 E. Lake Shore Dr
  • Congress Hotel, Chicago
  • Conrad Hilton Hotel, Chicago
  • Czech Lodge. 2519 Desplaines Ave
  • Der Rathskeller, Rockford
  • Don the Beachcomber. 101 E. Walton Place
  • Don Roth's Blackhawk Restaurant. 139 N. Wabash
  • Drake Hotel, Chicago
  • Edge water Beach Hotel. 5349 Sheridan Rd.
  • Forum Cafeteria. 64 W. Madison St.
  • Harding's Colonial Room. 21 S. Wabash Ave
  • Fred Harvey Dining Rooms. Union and Dearborn Stations
  • Harlequin Room and Harvey House Grill. Palmolive B 1 d g ., 919 N. Michigan.
  • The Bowl and Bottle. 71 E. Jackson
  • Gus Good Food Restaurant. 420 N. Dearborn St.
  • Hoe Row. 73 E. Lake St.
  • Isbell's Restaurant. 940 Rush St
  • J. H. Ireland Oyster House. 632-8 N. Clark St
  • Johnson's. 7117 Yates Blvd
  • Johnstone's Restaurant. In northwest Chicago at 4747 W. Peterson  Ave
  • Jule's Restaurant. 814 W. 71st St
  • Keller's Golden Ox Restaurant, Chicago - NN
  • Kerbell's Restaurant. 590 Diversey Pkwy
  • Kungsholm Restaurant, Chicago - NN
  • London House. 360 N. Michigan
  • Marshall Field & Company Tea Rooms, Chicago - NN
  • The Nantucket. 10437 S. Western Ave
  • Old Heidelberg Restaurant. 14 W. Randolph St
  • Ong Luk Yun Restaurant. 105 N. Dearborn St - The Picasso is now at this location
  • Palmer House, Chicago
  • Pete's Famous Steaks. 161-169 North Dearborn St
  • The Pit. 1139 N. Dearborn St
  • Pump Room, Chicago
  • Shangri-La. 222 N. State St.
  • Sirloin Room of the Stockyard Inn. 4178 S. Halsted St
  • Staley's. 127 S. Wells St
  • The Steak House. 744 Rush St.
  • Stouffer's. In Prudential Bldg. E. of Michigan Ave. at Randolph St
  • Terrace Restaurant. 55 W. Washington St
  • Toffenetti Restaurants. 225 S. Wabash Ave., 72 W. Randolph St
  • Toppers Restaurant and Lounge. 333 N. Austin Blvd
  • The Town House. 6935 Sheridan Rd
  • The Town Pump. 6345 N. Western Ave
  • William Tell Restaurant, Chicago - NL
  • Wrigley Building Restaurant. 410 N. Michigan Ave
  • George Diamond Charcoal Broiled Steak House. 512 S. Wabash Ave.
JRPfeff
Sirloin
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/16 19:26:07 (permalink)
Thanks to kozel, I was able to purchase a 1938 Edition of Adventures in Good Eating on ebay. It arrived today and I found some interesting things.
 
The book was definitely a work in progress for Duncan at that time. Unlike later versions, in this edition some restaurants simply list a city and a name. No address, comments, or prices; at this stage Duncan seemed intent on adding recommended restaurants as soon as possible then adding details later.
 
One of the remaining Wisconsin restaurants from the 1935 Christmas list, the Red Circle Inn, did not make the cut in 1938. They subsequently got their act back together and were in the 1948 and 1959 editions.
 
I was excited to find Heaven City, School in Mukwanago in the book. A restaurant remains at this location that we have enjoyed several times. The story of the original restaurant is quite interesting.
In 1932, Chicago street preacher A.J. Moore purchased the land and house from a Waukesha bank after it had foreclosed on poor Dewey, whose pendulum luck with cards apparently wasn't enough to ensure regular mortgage payments.
 
Arriving in Wisconsin with a number of followers for his hellfire and brimstone message, Moore purchased more than 400 acres of land and started a religious commune. To avoid paying taxes on the premises he opened the Heaven City School and tutored the children of his disciples, who cared for and worked on the property.
 
Moore was known as an astute businessman as well as a con man. His sect considered Heaven City integral to their vision of developing religious communes around the country.
 
After various distractions (such as the need for regular paying jobs) prevented Moore's commune from growing. only several people stayed on to help him develop Heaven City Hotel.
In 1938, Duncan wrote:
Heaven City is a "self-sustained, non-sectarian, cooperative school," so named because they "expect it to be the best place on earth." One of their sources of revenue is the serving of dinners from 12:30 to 6:30 daily. The menu consists of fruit cocktail, mushroom soup, spiced ham, roast turkey, roast beef, vegetables, salad, cake and ice cream and pie, cheese and coffee.
That is nothing like the menu at The Villa at Heaven City today. Today's food is certainly good enough to be Recommended by Duncan Hines.
 

post edited by JRPfeff - 2016/05/17 11:08:44
ThanksfortheCrepes
Cheeseburger
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/17 08:29:48 (permalink)
Here's a link that was quite interesting to me about the DH recommended Harvey's Cafeteria in Durham, NC. It is now defunct since 1967.
 
Here's another interesting link that involved the DH recommended Mayfair Cafeteria in Greensboro, NC. It does not involve a lot of food, but rather protests by blacks about segregation. This one's gone too.
 
I cannot say for sure if DH's S & W Cafeteria is the same at the one in Cameron Village, Raleigh, but I have eaten at K & W, it still exists, and is still very good. Very good! Here is the current yelp link.
 
I hope to locate a better solid connection to a still existing DH restaurant in NC soon, but the research is fun.
 
 
 
 
Louis
Double Chili Cheeseburger
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Re: Surviving Duncan Hines Family Restaurants 2016/05/17 17:08:20 (permalink)
That 1938 edition is likely the 3rd edition.  Adventures in Good Eating got more specific in spots once Duncan Hines became nationally famous overnight, thanks to an early December 1938 article in the Saturday Evening Post.  With nearly every edition afterwards, little improvements were made as Hines saw fit.
 
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