TrainFood

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zataar
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/07 08:49:21 (permalink)
Everyone's contributions to this thread have been so interesting. Thanks Mr. Mayor for posting the picture of the train at Cajon Pass. When I would ride the Southwest LTD from Kansas City to Los Angeles, the train's route took it way up in the Sangre De Christo mountain range. When it reached Raton Pass in southern Colorado the passengers could see the front cars and the back cars of the train at the same time, winding around the mountain side. The engineer would announce when it would happen and tell everyone to be sure to look out the windows. It was beautiful any time of year, but especially when snowing. I'm not sure that particular route still goes over Raton Pass.
#61
michaelgemmell
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/07 19:52:02 (permalink)
Agreed, Amtrak won't disappear this or next year, but I hope Peachpie and everyone else interested doesn't put this off for many years "until you retire." My partner, John, is so envious of my voyage to Galesburg last year, and in 2008, a few months after he retires, we're taking the CZ to Chicago and back for Christmas. The CZ is the most popular Amtrak train and would be the last to be eliminated, so I believe we will be able to share that then. It helps that the CZ runs through the district of the current Speaker of the House of Representatives.

Al, isn't that an F7 in your beautiful photo? To replicate the 3 railroads that ran the CZ I have a whole consist of HO-scale CZ cars, a WP F7A, a DRGW F7 A & B, but NO CB&Q F7 because what I see in the hobby shops isn't silver, it's gray. THAT is NOT what I remember pulling the CZ through my home town of Galesburg, but, oddly enough the St. Louis County Transportation Museum has a (real!) CB&Q F7 that IS gray. We have a full consist for our Super Chief, too, right down to F7 A-B-A. The "B" units are the powered units without a "front." The Super Chief passed just a half block from where I grew up, and the Santa Fe tracks pass under the CB&Q 3 blocks farther west. Of a summer night I could hear the trains on the CB&Q and the Santa Fe, and know which line, what direction, and freight versus passenger. I dreampt of taking that CZ to San Francisco, and now I live there, dreaming of taking the CZ again to Galesburg and Chicago.

The Southwest Chief still uses the original Santa Fe tracks over Raton Pass from Colorado into New Mexico.
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1bbqboy
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/08 09:47:01 (permalink)
Michael, I always remember passing through Galesburg on the way to Chicago.
I grew up over the hill from the Frisco tracks and yard. Hearing trains hum in the background was something I took for granted, and miss now. Our (short haul)train here going over the Siskiyous to Black Butte has been closed for Tunnel repairs for a 11/2 years now. (open this spring)
All I could think of when you mentioned your HO layout was "Beetlejuice",
where they're up in the attic perusing the town model. A miniature Galesburg in one corner, and "the City" in the other.
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mayor al
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/08 18:53:31 (permalink)
Peach- Try an email note using the Roadfood connection.

Michael, While the E's and the F's have the same basic shape These U P units are E-9's for sure. UP takes great pride in them...as they should. There are three units in the photo arranged A-B-A as they would be when pulling the City of Los Angeles or one of the other flagship trains on the Chicago to the West Coast runs. Here is a second view taken near my desert home. Notice that unit 949 leads in one shot and 951 in the other!



#64
mayor al
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/08 20:15:15 (permalink)
Without going into long boring details about the syncing of power from multiple units, let me just say that the power on a train is controlled from the lead unit. All other engines are controlled electronically from the engineer's position in the lead locomotive. Until recently on steep grades and other unusual circumstances, 'Helper units' usually in pairs were attached to the rear of the train to help push it up a difficult stretch of track...or to help slow it on a steep downgrade. These were manned engines working via radio with the lead power unit on the front of the train. In today's world that is an expense that needed to be saved. So instead additional power is added on the back, idleing in neutral until needed and then the lead crew flips a switch and the power is added by remote control. This is called DPU or distributed Power Units. It is a complicated process, with the weight of the train, the length, and the composition of the cargo and how it is spread over the train making a lot of variables to measure befor operating the whole thing. ESPECIALLY in places like Cajon, of Donner Pass or any twisty-turny rail area. Here is a set of engines (10 of them) being moved down the steep part of Cajon towards LA. No train, just a group of engines being taken to a yard to be put to work...Much like the cart-roundup at your nearby WalMart.


#65
mayor al
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/08 21:52:52 (permalink)
Peach, yeah I guess we got away from Dinner in the Diner somewhere in there, huh? One of the better rail websites is Trainorders.Com. I don't know if they are still 'free' or paid subscription only. But once you get used to ignoring the flame-wars you can learn a lot by reading others notes. One simple thing about engines...forward and reverse are the same thing..so seeing an engine running "backwards" makes no difference in the power or speed. The typical locomotive is a 4400 hp diesel. The engine powers alternators which in turn drive electric traction motors on each axle. Thus the term "Diesel-Electric". A sep. generator system on Amtrak trains delivers electrical current to the passenger cars for heat/AC/lights. These are not powered directly by the locomotive.
OK enough of this diversion.
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Hotrodder
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/09 01:33:38 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by BT
Aside from the passenger cars (regular airline-style seats in coach, compartments in the sleeping cars)


Quick comment... the coach seats are more like first class airline seats. I just got back from an overnight trip on Amtrak and I slept quite well in coach.

I had the steak in the dinning car on the way back, it was good but dinner was a bit pricey for what it was ($22)
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michaelgemmell
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/09 18:18:58 (permalink)
Al, I stand corrected on the locomotive designation. What's more, it's perfectly natural that the UP wouldn't use the same locos as their competitors did. I do know for a fact that the CZ was powered by F7s. How do you tell the difference? Nice pix, too!

Hotrodder, I want to point out gently that everyone working on the train makes a living wage because they are in a union, and that where your steak was cooked costs a great deal more to operate than your local steakhouse. You pay $10 today on an airplane for a very measly sandwich--just as a comparison. There are a lot of costs your meal had to cover. Please don't take my comments negatively, because I'm glad you used Amtrak, as that's the best way we can preserve Amtrak.

Thanks for your kind comments, Catherine!
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BT
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/09 23:45:38 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by michaelgemmell

Al, I stand corrected on the locomotive designation. What's more, it's perfectly natural that the UP wouldn't use the same locos as their competitors did. I do know for a fact that the CZ was powered by F7s. How do you tell the difference? Nice pix, too!

Hotrodder, I want to point out gently that everyone working on the train makes a living wage because they are in a union, and that where your steak was cooked costs a great deal more to operate than your local steakhouse. You pay $10 today on an airplane for a very measly sandwich--just as a comparison. There are a lot of costs your meal had to cover. Please don't take my comments negatively, because I'm glad you used Amtrak, as that's the best way we can preserve Amtrak.

Thanks for your kind comments, Catherine!


Michael--Being a bit of a cheapskate, I've always thought much as Hotrodder does that AMTRAK food would be pricey if I were paying for it separately, but since I cannot sleep in a position other than horizontal, I always go for a sleeper and tghe food is included.

Sorry I've been away all, but a family emergency has caused me to DRIVE to Florida (yuk--speed being critical and my kitty being with me so I had to stick to take-out, I admit I ate in the despised fast food franchises nearly all the way). See the Daytona thread for one suggestion here, though.
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michaelgemmell
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/10 15:47:13 (permalink)
BT, it was hard enough for me to sleep horizontally. I, too, was in a sleeper, so my meals were included, but I have always known the dining car prices are high--and why.

Hotrodder, I hope you weren't offended. Do you know how people ate before trains had dining cars? I'm reading "The Harvey Girls, Women who opened the West" by Lesley Poling-Kempes, pub. Marlowe & Co, NY, which I bought in the gift shop in the depot of the Grand Canyon Railway last June. Basically, trains would stop 3 times a day and let the passengers off for 20-30 minutes for meals. There were many abuses of this, with unscrupulous restauranteurs bribing railroad men to pull the train out before the passengers had gotten their paid-for meals. Fred Harvey created those Harvey Houses witht those legendary Harvey Girls as well as delicious food all along the route of the beloved Santa Fe railway. Don't want to read? Judy Garland starred in the 1944 MGM musical "The Harvey Girls," and I just might log off Roadfood and watch that this afternoon. The book author says that movie is somewhat over-romanticized, but it's still one of Judy's best efforts. I bet you will find the DVD for only $15, but it would be cheap at twice the price.

I worry a little less about the demise of Amtrak when I see how many of us share a love for railroads and passenger service.
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tiki
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/11 02:21:00 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by michaelgemmell

BT, it was hard enough for me to sleep horizontally. I, too, was in a sleeper, so my meals were included, but I have always known the dining car prices are high--and why.

I worry a little less about the demise of Amtrak when I see how many of us share a love for railroads and passenger service.


Michael--since you like trains and food so much and are pretty close by---check this out------ http://www.shastasunset.com/
Anyone out there on the left coast--if you like trains and dinner--this is well worth a look see. Enjoy!!! I see they just added a "Dance Car"---complete with hardwood flooring!!!!
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michaelgemmell
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/11 17:26:58 (permalink)
Tiki, we're going on the Napa Valley Wine Train Memorial Day weekend with our friend from St. Louis who will be visiting then. We will keep that train in mind for the future. About that dance floor, I must say that for a mountain railroad, it makes me think of the scene where Fred Astaire and Jane Powell dance on a rolling ocean liner in "Royal Wedding." The prices that train list make me feel better about what we paid for the Wine Train Vista-Dome luncheon!
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1bbqboy
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/11 17:36:12 (permalink)
Michael, though I know you vowed to never set foot in Oregon, The McCloud dinner train is a cool one, and not far away. My mother and sister took it a couple of years ago. Of course, if you're that close, you're obligated to drive the extra 75 miles and come up and eat your way around Ashland.
Bill
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1bbqboy
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/11 17:53:52 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Peachpie9

I took a phone call from London this morning. My daughter (henceforth "R") just arrived there from Edinburgh. She said that she could have saved money and taken the bus, but that she wanted to ride the TRAIN! Said it was lovely, she had a view out the window of the North Sea. She described the train thus: plane - wings + views. She said on the trip from Bath to Edinburgh, she sat in a seat that held four, two facing two, which she said was nice and had lots of leg room (she's 5'9").

She has been sick (ARGHHHH!!!). She was enamored of Scotland, but too sick to see the west coast, which she had planned to do. She slept 18 hours straight in her hotel in Edinburgh. She said that everyone in her group got sick, but she seems to have gotten the sickest. It's a respiratory thing. She said it's even made her too weak to walk to things, so she's had take cabs and such. She is feeling MUCH better, but I can hear the huskiness in her voice. *heart twisting in knots*

R's favorite foods in England have been rhubarb yogurt and the orange juice with raspberries from Marks & Spencer. She doesn't say much about the food in general, but I will quiz her when she gets home.

R's phone cards are working great, but she said at first she was leaving out one digit of the country code, so this woman would come on and yell at her. Fortunately, the yelling was in a language that R doesn't speak!

She is scheduled to see two plays this next week, and attend the Philharmonic. She is going to visit the Tates, one of them for the second time, and wants to fit in another trip to the British Museum, which she described as "amazing."

R and her friends are going to a pub where the owner is going to explain to them about different beers. R says that she has been ordering "random beers," and says they've tasted good, but she would like to know more about it. She says she can't finish the amount you get when you order one.

One thing she talked about gave me pause. She said that from the first day she arrived there, she felt like she was home.

Now, I have known since she entered a contest in the summer between her 8th and 9th grades that she would live in the city someday. The contest required her to take the SAT's--three years early--and she scored 200 points higher than the average high school junior. Well, she won an all-expense-paid trip to Denver, UT, to study engineering at Denver University for the summer. She never really came back from that trip. She belongs in the city, and there is no doubt that that is where she will end up.

But...LONDON? She says that she just feels like she's always been there. She says people stop her and ask her for directions. She says it's not the cleanest city, nor the most picturesque, but she says it speaks to her in ways no place ever has. She said, "I miss you guys so much! I wish I could see you, but not have to leave here to do it."

Hey, I know the deal is you give your kids wings...but I didn't know they were allowed to use them to come to rest on the other side of the world!

Catherine


Hey Peachey, My nephew is in Portland studying film and recording and went to Israel this summer; my niece spent a summer in Japan, and a year in Arkansas, but now is back in Ashland. Don't know whether you grew up in Moscow, but as for my wife and I, big city midwestern kids, we spent our whole lives looking for something like the Rogue Valley, only to see our relations leave for the Bright Lights and big city. It's always been so, I guess. What everyone needs and wants out of their living situation and locale doesn't seem to be subject to parental input., but they always come home to roost. My stepfather was an immigrant from Scotland, and my mother and he +my Aunt and Uncle trekked there in the '80's to see where he was born, meet relatives, see the sights. Put him at peace with something he didn't really remember.
#74
BT
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/11 23:01:47 (permalink)
Personally, I grew up in the "burbs" (of Washington, DC as it happens). But I loved living in the city when I went away to college in the middle of Baltimore. Then more schooling took me to a small town (Durham, NC) and another (Gainesville, FL) but I always wanted to try the urban lifestyle again which I ultimately accomplished by buying a condo right in the heart of San Francisco. And for many years a felt so at home there. And I still love the food, the excitement, the choices in the city. But sometimes I want to be able to see stars (city lights and Pacific fog make that almost impossible) and hear NOTHING (no traffic constant traffic noise) nowadays. So I got a small place to spend the winter in a small community in southern Arizona where only two things break the nocturnal silence: a very distant train whistle and the yowling coyotes. One's notions about where one belongs change. I suspect your daughter's American roots will reassert eventually and she'll happily come home.
#75
michaelgemmell
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/12 00:30:45 (permalink)
Bill, it's true I haven't been to Oregon since 1991, but what I saw I loved. My late partner and I did the jet boats at Gold Beach. Wow!

My parents "escaped" from Chicago in 1948 after living there 10 years, moving to Galesburg IL, my mom's home town. I heard those trains there and dreampt of the West. At 22 I moved to Chicago, but at 38 it wouldn't do anymore. I felt at home here in SF right away. BT isn't the only one who'd like to avoid the city noise. I pass by his home on the way to the theatre. Unfortunately the traffic noise at our home is worse. My partner and I are planning our "escape" to the San Fernando Valley in a few years, where we'll exchange SF's restaurants and theatre for a pool and warm summer nights.

Just like all the Americans who went before us, we're a restless people. We came here on ships, took covered wagons overland, and built canals until the railroad increased our travel capabilities geometrically. Despite common usage of technically advanced means of transportation, we preserve some passenger rail services as proof that we remember our history. This suggests we may be civilized after all.
#76
corabeth
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/13 18:26:27 (permalink)
My dad worked for the New York Central Railroad in West Virginia. In Feburary 1955, my mom,dad,siser & I(age 8)traveled from Chareston, WV to Jacksonville, FL on the train. Since my dad was a railroad employee, we all had passes for our trip. We left our car at the NYC freight depot & got a taxi(a first for me, this trips was full of firsts) to the C & O passenger station. The first part of our trip was from Charleston to Cincinnati. The station in Cincy was unbelieveable!! So many people, so many trains, arriving & departing, I still remember how impressive the murals were. We then boarded our Pullman car for our trip from Cincy to Jacksonville. My mother had sewn matching PJ's & robes for my sister & I. We had to change for bed in the restroom. What a restroom!! Shining brass fixtures, the fluffiest towels handed out by the smiling attendant & a separate room with a bathtub. We were so surprised when our 4 facing seats were now an upper & low bed. My sister & I slept in the upper berth.

Now for the food- although, I was just 8 years old, I still remember the meals. Everything was so elegant. The heavy starched napkins in silver napkin rings, the white gloves that the waiters wore, the glasses & crystal. We had soft boiled eggs in egg cups with strips of buttered toast for breakfast. My parents coffee was served in a silver pot. Lunch was a shared club sandwich with the crusts cut from the bread. My dad took my sister & I to the dining car for a afternoon hot fudge sundae served in silver goblets. I don't think I have ever had a more elegant, civlized dining experience than those meals on that trip.
#77
Pancho
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/13 19:20:29 (permalink)
My wife, daughter and myself started riding the City of New Orleans from Chicago to NOLA and back several years ago. The train departs Chicago nightly at about 8:00 and arrives in New Orleans the following afternoon arond 2:30. We go coach, take light sleeping bags, and wake up at daylight at 6:00AM in Memphis (half-way). After a great Southern breakfast we enjoy the Mississippi scenery and the "backyards of America". Some of the sights are not so pretty, but it was a cultural awakening for my daughter that first trip when she was 6 years old. I spend the rest of the trip in the observation car and try to catch glimpses of any sort of wildlife. We detrain in NOLA and grab a cab to the LeRichelieu Hotel and usually stay in Paul McCartney's suite when available. The rest of the week we are typical tourists even though we have been down there at least 20 times. Cafe DuMonde every morning is a ritual we will never change. Anyway, it's a great family bonding experience, and I will miss it terribly when "our little girl" won't be on the train with us.
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tiki
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/13 21:01:31 (permalink)
CoraBeth and Pancho---great stories---thanks for sharing!!!
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BT
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/14 13:13:56 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by Peachpie9

Probably because of the unseasonably mild weather we are having, the coyotes here have been howling most of the night, and they sound as close as just beyond the barn. It's beautiful music, but it drives Carla, our Rottweiler, insane. She gets so angry she digs up chunks of lawn with her claws. The flying divots often hit the house, and I have to rinse the mud and grass off the next day. *giggle*


Imagine if she could also "enjoy" a family of javalina coming to visit every night from their home in the arroyo. I don't have a dog (I've got a cat) but the next door neighbors have two--a Lab and a mixed critter that, itself, looks like a reddish coyote--and they both get very excited when their owner takes them on nocturnal walks and they encounter the local javalina.
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1bbqboy
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/14 13:27:37 (permalink)
Arizona always seemed a land of extremes during my 4 year stint in Scottsdale. The Vegetation is sparse, but both beautiful and dangerous. The same can be said for the Wildlife. Scorpions, Cougars, Javalinas, SNAKES...
In fact the population was/is unstable in the extreme too. Goes with the landscape and weather extremes. Harsh. Transient. We were happy to escape, although I miss spring training.
Has anyone taken the train to the Grand Canyon?
http://thetrain.com/learnmore_tv.cfm
Or this one a little further south?

http://www.verdecanyonrr.com/slideshow.htm
#81
BT
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/14 15:15:10 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by bill voss

Arizona always seemed a land of extremes during my 4 year stint in Scottsdale. The Vegetation is sparse, but both beautiful and dangerous. The same can be said for the Wildlife. Scorpions, Cougars, Javalinas, SNAKES...
In fact the population was/is unstable in the extreme too. Goes with the landscape and weather extremes. Harsh. Transient. We were happy to escape, although I miss spring training.
Has anyone taken the train to the Grand Canyon?
http://thetrain.com/learnmore_tv.cfm
Or this one a little further south?

http://www.verdecanyonrr.com/slideshow.htm


Bill, I think the Phoenix/Scottsdale area is more "extreme" than the rest of the state. I know it's hotter in the summer than where my place is (because it's 2000 feet lower), though I'm admittedly not here in the summer. But the Phoenix metro area is a big city with big city problems and big city transience. In my neighborhood of several hundred homes ( http://esperanzaestates.com/ ), there are typically 2 or 3 for sale--usually because someone died. This does not bespeak a high rate of transience to me. In Tucson itself, there's a certain amount of coming and going associated with the University of AZ, but the presence of the university was another attraction to this area for me. The vegetation isn't even that sparse. Tucson gets an average of 12 inches of rain per year--50% more than San Diego. Unlike the Mojave desert, the Sonoran has native trees (palo verde, mesquite, ironwood) in significant numbers and the mountains surrounding the Santa Cruz Valley are heavily forested with evergreens. One thing I do miss: a greater variety of "roadfood" places serving "not-Mexican" food.
#82
michaelgemmell
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/14 15:17:07 (permalink)
John and I did both last June.

We enjoyed the Grand Canyon Railway last summer. We liked the train itself, riding the least expensive coaches to the Canyon (a morning run in June wasn't too hot) and a Vista-Dome back to Williams. We liked staying the night at Canyon Village 's Maswik Lodge and especially enjoyed our dinner in the Dining Room at El Tovar. The latter accepts reservations up to 30 days in advance from those not guests at El Tovar, and if they tell you "call back the day before," DO IT, that's how we got in, since our package got us nothing at El Tovar. However, we did NOT like the Fray Marcos Hotel that the Railway runs or their restaurant. We had a room at the hotel the night before we left and the night we returned from the Canyon, as well as some included meals at their restaurant. See if you can get a package from them that does not include any of that. Despite its grand entrance, probably left over from its days as a Harvey House, virtually nothing else comes anywhere close to Fred Harvey's standards. We got the royal runaround at the front desk of the hotel. Still, we loved visiting the Canyon with no car and would do it again, but without their package.

We took the Verde Canyon Railway a few days later. It made for a pleasant afternoon. This time, we got a package with the Best Western Cottonwood Inn with which we were very happy. Do take the "first class" ride. The extras (drink and snacks) and the comfortable seating were well worth it, and we got a cheaper rate at the BW in the bargain. We found good Roadfood in Cottonwood courtesy of the folks at the BW desk, and look forward to doing the Verde Canyon with my brother in the future.
#83
Sundancer7
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/14 15:22:28 (permalink)
The Phoenix and Tucson area is special to me as I have spent a lot of time in both places. I started several operations there. Most recently in Tucson. The wildlife is extreme. I was staying at the Residence Inn by Marriott and I stepped out on my deck late in the evening with just my socks and shorts on. I stepped on something that crunched. I did not have the lights on so I stepped back in side and flipped the switched. I observed two scorpion that were squished in the mating position. I got lucky in not having being stung by these testy anachrids.

I became much more observant and happen to see several more of them after dark. They can run like a racehorse.

I also saw an abundance of black widow spiders and in fact shook one out of my shoes. How it got into the room, I do not know but there seems to be an abundance of them in the southwest.

Food is great in Tucson though.

Paul E. Smith
Knoxville, TN
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1bbqboy
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/14 15:32:33 (permalink)
BT, I agree completely with your overview. That extra 1 or 2000 feet makes a huge difference in summer. I love the rest of Arizona outside of The 2 giant Metro areas, Sonoran Desert included. Aside from Prescott and Flagstaff, there just aren't many
"Cleaveresque" small towns that have a working economic base. Bisbee and Yuma, maybe.
I always felt the friction from Az. being such a young state with a lot of merging cultures. That used to be exciting, now it's less so for me.
#85
BT
Filet Mignon
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RE: TrainFood 2005/02/14 21:26:52 (permalink)
Peachie: It's a lot less extreme in early Spring and late Autumn which is why I like it there at those times. But June/July are at least extreme on the temperature scale (105 in Tucson, 110+ in Phoenix) and then the summer thunderstorms come, sometimes with amazing downpours. Although I personally rather enjoy thunderstorms, that is the season when I choose to be in the Bay Area where a temp above 70 brings complaints about "the heat" and the I can eat all the exotic goodies I've learned to love.

By the way, in case you don't know, those "wild pigs" are really javalina, a different species but appearing quite similar. And so far no one has mentioned the region's most wonderful and exotic species of wildlife, the jaguar (sometimes known as El Tigre): http://www.wildlifeconservation.org/wcm-home/wcm-article/5880662 . Perhaps that is because these were thought extinct north of the border, but a few have recently been photographed in Southern Arizona. Anyway, just the thought of those critters wandering near my home (far smaller than 8000 sq ft and no art collection) seems awesome to me.
#86
1bbqboy
Sirloin
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RE: TrainFood 2005/03/27 09:24:33 (permalink)
Well, the schedule is out for the third, and FINAL year of the Lewis & Clark Explorer train, running from Portland to Astoria and back. Get your tickets while ya can, guys and gals.
http://www.lcbo.net/traingo.html
#87
mr chips
Filet Mignon
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RE: TrainFood 2005/03/27 20:26:24 (permalink)
I took the Lewis and Clark Train last year. A peaceful, calming ride with nice views of the river. There is a shuttle bus service that takes you to the sights of Astoria and there are some decent seafood restaurants. It is a wonderful day.
#88
The Travelin Man
Filet Mignon
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RE: TrainFood 2005/04/16 22:51:08 (permalink)
For all of you train freaks out there -- no, this is not food-related, but for all of you thinking about taking a train in the near future, there was recently yet another incident that does not bode well for the financially strapped AMTRAK.....
quote:
Amtrak has removed all 20 of its Acela Express trainsets from service on the Boston-New York-Washington Northeast Corridor after cracks were found in the braking system on many of the trainsets’ coaches during routine inspections. Cancelled are 15 New York-Washington trains and 11 New York-Boston trains, which will remain out of service until the problem is resolved.

That could take a considerable amount of time. The cracks have been found in the spokes of the axle-mounted hubs that support the coaches’ inboard disc brake rotors. There are three inboard rotors per axle, four axles per coach. Multiplying that by six coaches yields 72 hubs and rotors per trainset. That’s 1,440 integral hub/rotor assemblies in the fleet of 20 trainsets. The only way to replace the hubs is to drop every wheelset, remove every wheel, and remove every hub/rotor assembly.

Much is unclear at this point: Whether the hubs can be replaced without modifications or if a redesign is needed, and how long that will take. Whether there are enough spare hubs in inventory (probably not). Whether Amtrak will be able to substitute Amfleet-equipped trains to protect NEC service. In any case the spoke-cracking problem most likely means the Acela Express will not be in service for a while. That service accounts for 53,000 NEC seats—over $6 million in revenue—weekly.


Plan accordingly....
#89
BT
Filet Mignon
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RE: TrainFood 2005/04/17 02:12:48 (permalink)
quote:
Originally posted by stevekoe

For all of you train freaks out there -- no, this is not food-related, but for all of you thinking about taking a train in the near future, there was recently yet another incident that does not bode well for the financially strapped AMTRAK.....

quote:
Amtrak has removed all 20 of its Acela Express trainsets from service on the Boston-New York-Washington Northeast Corridor after cracks were found in the braking system on many of the trainsets’ coaches during routine inspections. Cancelled are 15 New York-Washington trains and 11 New York-Boston trains, which will remain out of service until the problem is resolved.

That could take a considerable amount of time. The cracks have been found in the spokes of the axle-mounted hubs that support the coaches’ inboard disc brake rotors. There are three inboard rotors per axle, four axles per coach. Multiplying that by six coaches yields 72 hubs and rotors per trainset. That’s 1,440 integral hub/rotor assemblies in the fleet of 20 trainsets. The only way to replace the hubs is to drop every wheelset, remove every wheel, and remove every hub/rotor assembly.

Much is unclear at this point: Whether the hubs can be replaced without modifications or if a redesign is needed, and how long that will take. Whether there are enough spare hubs in inventory (probably not). Whether Amtrak will be able to substitute Amfleet-equipped trains to protect NEC service. In any case the spoke-cracking problem most likely means the Acela Express will not be in service for a while. That service accounts for 53,000 NEC seats—over $6 million in revenue—weekly.


Plan accordingly....


Well, let's just hope they have some sort of warranty from the manufacturer and some kind of business interruption insurance.
#90
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