Uff-da, that accent, again

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wanderingjew
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Re: Uff-da, that accent, again 2015/02/05 09:42:19 (permalink)
CNW
 
There are only two accents that I have a problem with and have to pay real close attention to make sure that I understand. Those are the Northern Alabama and the Maine Downeastern accents. I generally only have that issue when I am talking to someone born before 1955 or so. They grew up when the radio and television voices were for the most part local and the only other accent they heard was a couple of hours on the radio or TV. By the early 70's young broadcasters were taking classes in trying to sound like a Midwesterner because almost all the famous broadcasters were from the Midwest. By the middle of the 70's your radio DJ's; local TV reporters and anchors; and almost all actors were speaking in a Midwestern accent. Because of this, regional accents (other then Midwestern) have become softer.
 
 
 
CNW



Funny you mention that. Rhode Island accents are as strong as ever at any age young or old.  New York accents (and Boston accents) have become very subtle among those under 50 for the most part.

As far as midwestern accents there are several so that's somewhat of a broad statement. I would disagree with your statement when you refer to midwesterners who have the Inland North accent (Chicago, Milwaukee, Detroit, Cleveland) and the Northern Accent (U.P of Michigan) Minnesota, North Dakota, Northern Wisconsin.But wholeheartedly agree with you when you refer to those with the Northern Midland (Omaha, Des Moines) and Southern Midland (Kansas City, Indianapolis) accent. In fact it's no surprise that Johnny Carson who was from Nebraska and David Letterman from Indianapolis two legendary talk show hosts have the classic "Midwest" accent
 
 
#31
mlm
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Re: Uff-da, that accent, again 2015/02/05 14:55:03 (permalink)
Worst regional dialect I encountered was a woman in customer services on my phone, once. I have no idea where she was from. I'm guessing she was black and from some part of the south where they have a soft, slurring dialect. On top of that, it sounded like she had a lisp of some sort. She was very nice and tried hard to make herself understood but we had to give up pretty soon and she went to get a co-worker to talk to me. I didn't want to embaress her but I just couldn't get past it. She seemed pretty resigned when she went to get her co-worker so I guess the issue had come up before. I am somewhat hard of hearing. The one bad thing she did was to try and shout when I couldn't understand her which distorted her voice even more. Some people never will learn that just plain 'loud' doesn't help much and shrieks never do. Careful enunciation, firm voice, longer pauses between words and a slower pace all do but not just a yell. Still she did try hard and was not rude.
post edited by mlm - 2015/02/05 15:00:30
#32
mayor al
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Re: Uff-da, that accent, again 2015/02/05 15:14:19 (permalink)
CNW- Realize, of course, that I have spent at least 20 years on each--the East Coast, The West Coast and the Mid-West, then toss in a couple of years in Idaho for good measure, and you will understand why I chuckle when I listen (read) to your linquistic study... English, (Our Version) will unravel quickly when it meets ANY other language... !!
( BTW-IT IS SODA !!  or maybe TONIC ? )
 
I have noted the audible difference between two gentlemen speaking, one from Tidewater Virginia, the other from Dothan, Alabama, and cannot describe the variation in the "Southern" accent, but it is noticiable. Then add a Kentuckianan and you have the beginnings of a Southern Tower of Babel.
post edited by mayor al - 2015/02/05 15:22:43
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Michael Hoffman
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Re: Uff-da, that accent, again 2015/02/05 20:52:00 (permalink)
CNW
 
There are only two accents that I have a problem with and have to pay real close attention to make sure that I understand. Those are the Northern Alabama and the Maine Downeastern accents. I generally only have that issue when I am talking to someone born before 1955 or so. They grew up when the radio and television voices were for the most part local and the only other accent they heard was a couple of hours on the radio or TV. By the early 70's young broadcasters were taking classes in trying to sound like a Midwesterner because almost all the famous broadcasters were from the Midwest. By the middle of the 70's your radio DJ's; local TV reporters and anchors; and almost all actors were speaking in a Midwestern accent. Because of this, regional accents (other then Midwestern) have become softer.
 
 
 
 




Actually, that's not a Midwestern accent. It's a General American one.
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easydoesit
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Re: Uff-da, that accent, again 2015/02/06 05:50:12 (permalink)
Well, as long as we're all telling stories, this one's about the movie Fargo and "Yah!"
 
In January 2011 we rented a condo in Bradenton FL.  One day my wife was at one of our favorite places picking up some lunch (fantastic cheesesteaks with Amoroso bread flown down daily), and the barmaid asked her where in the Midwest she was from.  My wife told her, and asked her how she knew.  She said she had never been to the Midwest, but had seen the movie Fargo, and was tipped by my wife's continual use of the word "Yah."  
 
I was waiting in the car.  My wife came out and told me that, and I scoffed, "We don't say that so often!"   But we soon realized after a short time that we did.  Later, I called my sister in Milwaukee and started to tell he about it, and she "Yah'd" me twice before I barely got started.  Then friends from Winona MN, on the Mississippi River, flew down to see us for a week, and all four of us were Yah-ing" it up and down in all directions!
 
My wife and I tried, for a while, to break ourselves of that word by reminding each other whenever we said it, but that soon got tiresome and we just gave up, and we talk like whoever in the heck we are.
 
One thing for Wandering Jew, my and my sister's "Milwaukee" accent would be one distinction you have made, while the further north and west portion of Minnesota (toward Fargo area) would be another.  But we both had the same frequent usage of that one word.
 
That barmaid, of course, would not have known those distinctions, as she'd never been there.
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Sonny Funzio
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Re: Uff-da, that accent, again 2015/02/06 13:42:58 (permalink)
Hope a small repost is not minded ...
About 7+ years ago I posted about my Finnish family and their pronunciation of the meat pies known as "pasties" ... I thought it might be amusing to post it here again. 
Captioned from that old post ...
 --------------------------
In Michigan's Upper Peninsula, the popular meat pies made with beef, potatoes and the occasional swede are pronounced "pah-sties" by the majority of "yoopers" (residents of the U.P).
However, I have relatives of Finnish descent, specifically some female cousins, who insist on pronouncing them (intentionally) like the little tasseled articles of clothing that dancers wear ... "Pay-stees" ... for the amusement of us sugarbeeters and flatlanders who come up to visit the grandparents.
Sometimes the dialect is so thick ya really gotta listen close.
"Yah couldja do me favor, eh?; jump in the Lada an goh pick me up some paystees? I'm bine ... ders raha in my chuke in da glovebox, n' git yerself a jumbo. Holy man I'm hungry!"
-----------------------------
... In conversation my family and some of their friends used "Lada" (referring to the vehicle brand) or "karri" in place of "car" (I think "Lada" was just really local.  I never saw a Lada up there that I can recall.)  If it was the pickup truck though, it was "da roki". 
"Raha" used in the quote above is a slang Yooper/Finglish term for money (I think it originally mean furs).  And a "jumbo" is a quart bottle of beer ... as in "Let's go shopco and get some jumbos, eh"
 
This is all mostly speaking "yooper" that has some Finglish thrown in.  Like I mentioned, straight Finglish in conversation is difficult to understand unless you speak it, like any other foreign language.  I think it is mostly the very old folks up there who speak it now. 
 
post edited by Sonny Funzio - 2015/02/06 14:49:21
#36
mlm
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Re: Uff-da, that accent, again 2015/02/06 13:45:31 (permalink)
Heh, heh.
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wanderingjew
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Re: Uff-da, that accent, again 2015/02/07 09:52:21 (permalink)
easydoesit
 
One thing for Wandering Jew, my and my sister's "Milwaukee" accent would be one distinction you have made, while the further north and west portion of Minnesota (toward Fargo area) would be another.  But we both had the same frequent usage of that one word.
 
That barmaid, of course, would not have known those distinctions, as she'd never been there.




 
I always thought the Milwaukee accent was "on the cusp" with the "Inland North" (Great Lakes)  and Northern Midwest (Fargo style) accent, having characteristics of both. I can almost always tell the difference between a speaker from Chicago vs Milwaukee. 
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easydoesit
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Re: Uff-da, that accent, again 2015/02/07 10:29:38 (permalink)
wanderingjew
easydoesit
 
One thing for Wandering Jew, my and my sister's "Milwaukee" accent would be one distinction you have made, while the further north and west portion of Minnesota (toward Fargo area) would be another.  But we both had the same frequent usage of that one word.
 
That barmaid, of course, would not have known those distinctions, as she'd never been there.




 
I always thought the Milwaukee accent was "on the cusp" with the "Inland North" (Great Lakes)  and Northern Midwest (Fargo style) accent, having characteristics of both. I can almost always tell the difference between a speaker from Chicago vs Milwaukee. 




This is what I based my remark on, seemed to me you included Milwaukee in with Chicago and points east.  Okay, I've got it, we are on the cusp, and so will all of Wisconsin will be included in the Northern Accent, including the Beloit/Kenosha area?.
 
WJ quote:
I would disagree with your statement when you refer to midwesterners who have the Inland North accent (Chicago, Milwaukee, Detroit, Cleveland) and the Northern Accent (U.P of Michigan) Minnesota, North Dakota, Northern Wisconsin.
endquote 
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ScreamingChicken
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Re: Uff-da, that accent, again 2015/02/07 10:37:30 (permalink)
wanderingjew
I can almost always tell the difference between a speaker from Chicago vs Milwaukee.

That's because when someone from Chicago is talking you have to watch out for the bits of saaaasage that spray past the mustache and the constant references to Da Coach.
 

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wanderingjew
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Re: Uff-da, that accent, again 2015/02/07 11:00:01 (permalink)
easydoesit
wanderingjew
easydoesit
 
One thing for Wandering Jew, my and my sister's "Milwaukee" accent would be one distinction you have made, while the further north and west portion of Minnesota (toward Fargo area) would be another.  But we both had the same frequent usage of that one word.
 
That barmaid, of course, would not have known those distinctions, as she'd never been there.




 
I always thought the Milwaukee accent was "on the cusp" with the "Inland North" (Great Lakes)  and Northern Midwest (Fargo style) accent, having characteristics of both. I can almost always tell the difference between a speaker from Chicago vs Milwaukee. 




This is what I based my remark on, seemed to me you included Milwaukee in with Chicago and points east.  Okay, I've got it, we are on the cusp, and so will all of Wisconsin will be included in the Northern Accent, including the Beloit/Kenosha area?.
 
WJ quote:
I would disagree with your statement when you refer to midwesterners who have the Inland North accent (Chicago, Milwaukee, Detroit, Cleveland) and the Northern Accent (U.P of Michigan) Minnesota, North Dakota, Northern Wisconsin.
endquote 




I think most dialect maps include the Milwaukee area in with the Inland North. For example, my friend when Julianne who is from suburban Milwaukee moved to Seattle, everyone used to ask her if she was from Chicago or Minnesota. I would never mistake someone from Chicago as being from Minnesota and vice versa. However I've guessed Chicago on some folks I know and they're actually from Cleveland or Detroit. A few years back I mistook someone from the U.P. of Michigan as being from Minnesota. I don't know enough about the Beloit/Kenosha area.
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Re: Uff-da, that accent, again 2015/03/05 15:17:36 (permalink)
I'm from Niagara Falls, NY and ever since I moved away, I hear "you don't talk like you're from New York" - I just say that I talk like I'm from Western New York, and explain that we talk more like people from Cleveland or Detroit than people from New York City or Long Island.
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