Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza

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Glenn1234
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/06 18:12:05 (permalink)
 
I can't recall a time I had "discovered" pizza.  It was always around.  My mother made it from scratch, or we went out to a pizza place.  One of the places we went to early on was called, "Two Guys from Italy", located in East Greenwich, RI, which is one town north of my home town.  Today, that place is called, "Frank and John from Italy", and is close to where Dale lives now.  Janet and I met him and friend Mike for dinner there about a year or so ago.  
 
Glenn
 
 
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/06 19:01:08 (permalink)
Glenn1234
 
I can't recall a time I had "discovered" pizza.  It was always around.  My mother made it from scratch, or we went out to a pizza place.  One of the places we went to early on was called, "Two Guys from Italy", located in East Greenwich, RI, which is one town north of my home town.  Today, that place is called, "Frank and John from Italy", and is close to where Dale lives now.  Janet and I met him and friend Mike for dinner there about a year or so ago.  
 
Glenn
 
 




I'm going to take a wild guess and say that was actually closer to 3 years ago.. Time Flies...
Oh and Frank and John's from Italy is also Joe Rogo's home away from home whenever he's passing through Rhode Island.
#32
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/06 21:02:37 (permalink)
My mother loved Red Baron pizzas, but even she went nuts for the way it was made in my school cafeteria in Clarksville, TN. It was square with a layer of sauce, then ground sausage and then a scattering of cheese on top. A great mess! The head chef was German. Her cookies were to die for. Mom never sent me to school with a sack lunch again after that Parent's Night. 
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/06 21:46:26 (permalink)
wanderingjew
Glenn1234
 
I can't recall a time I had "discovered" pizza.  It was always around.  My mother made it from scratch, or we went out to a pizza place.  One of the places we went to early on was called, "Two Guys from Italy", located in East Greenwich, RI, which is one town north of my home town.  Today, that place is called, "Frank and John from Italy", and is close to where Dale lives now.  Janet and I met him and friend Mike for dinner there about a year or so ago.  
 
Glenn
 
 




I'm going to take a wild guess and say that was actually closer to 3 years ago.. Time Flies...
Oh and Frank and John's from Italy is also Joe Rogo's home away from home whenever he's passing through Rhode Island.




 
Oh, wow!  It was that long ago?  Time does fly.  
 
Glenn
 
 
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/06 21:56:28 (permalink)
wanderingjew
Glenn1234
 
I can't recall a time I had "discovered" pizza.  It was always around.  My mother made it from scratch, or we went out to a pizza place.  One of the places we went to early on was called, "Two Guys from Italy", located in East Greenwich, RI, which is one town north of my home town.  Today, that place is called, "Frank and John from Italy", and is close to where Dale lives now.  Janet and I met him and friend Mike for dinner there about a year or so ago.  
 
Glenn
 
 




I'm going to take a wild guess and say that was actually closer to 3 years ago.. Time Flies...
Oh and Frank and John's from Italy is also Joe Rogo's home away from home whenever he's passing through Rhode Island.




After thinking about it a bit more, I'm pretty sure it was during the week of my (and Mike's) 30th high school reunion.  That would have been mid or late July of 2014.  So, it is coming up on 3 years in a few months.  Time does fly!   
 
Glenn
 
 
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/06 22:20:38 (permalink)
1955 - St. Marys, PA - Population, around 9000.
I couple of brothers built a little shack in the front yard of their farm on the "Million Dollar Highway" just outside of town.
The "Million Dollar Highway" was so named because that's what it cost to build the 25 mile stretch of road between DuBois, PA and St. Marys back in the Depression '30's by the CCC over mountainous terrain. Today, that same road would cost Billions to build.
But I Digress. 
I don't remember the brothers names but they had been to a city somewhere and ate some pizza and decided to bring pizza to the hicks.
You drove down a dirt driveway and pulled into the field to get to the counter. Take out only.
We would buy a pizza and drive another mile or 2 down the Million Dollar Highway to the drive in movies.
I've never had pizza that tasted any better than that pizza. PERIOD!
 
#36
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/06 22:54:51 (permalink)
I had my first pizza in the summer of 1968.  It was a carry-out at a place called Pizza-Roma on 2nd street, about a block from the downtown section of Henderson, Kentucky.  It was OK; nothing really to complain about.  I don't remember what I had (probably cheese or pepperoni), but I remember the parmesan cheese had the texture of sand--and did 25 years later.  It was the only pizza place in a town of 18,000 for a couple of years.  Dave's Pizza came in 1970 (it is still around and is my go-to place when I want a pizza in Henderson).  Others soon followed.  Pizza-Roma ground to a halt sometime in the mid-80s; it couldn't compete with many better pizza recipes in the area.
 
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/07 09:41:08 (permalink)
When I was little, we lived in Newark, DE, and the pizza place frequented by my parent's was "Pappy's Pizza" (been gone a loooong time, although I think there may actually still be other locations from that chain in existence.  There was one in Johnstown PA a few years ago when I drove through).  I wasn't terribly impressed by the pizza there, instead enjoying going more for the act of watching the guys throw the pizza crusts (it was one of those joints where they had a window expressly for the purposes of watching).
 
But my father is from New Haven, and frequent trips up to New Haven occurred, and around the age of 6, I remember a visit to Pepe's pizza[1](where the name confused me, since it's so similar to the "Pappy's" we'd be going to), but I remember that I actually really liked the pizza.  After that, I started to have enough appreciation for pizza that my family started looking for better pizza places around Delaware (finally setting on a long-gone place called The Four Seasons that was actually quite good)
 
[1] My father is from a Pepe's family.  Not 100% sure if he's ever  been to Sally's, since it's one of those families that had strong opinions.  My grandfather knew most of the folks at Pepe's back in the day, and one just did. not. go. to. Sally's.  There were exactly three acceptable pizza places in the New Haven area, in a strict order: Pepe's, The Modern (if one was on a schedule, only!) and Bimonte's (if one wanted to not drive as far from my aunt's place in North Haven).  I'm not sure I'm fully forgiven for my last trip to Sally's.
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Tony Bad
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/07 09:56:40 (permalink)
I think pizza discovered me, as I can't remember not having pizza. I will confess that as a boy in the 60's every trip to the grocery store included my begging for these, which I ate when ever my mother would let me... 
 
 

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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/07 09:58:37 (permalink)
kaszeta
My father is from a Pepe's family.  Not 100% sure if he's ever  been to Sally's, since it's one of those families that had strong opinions.  My grandfather knew most of the folks at Pepe's back in the day, and one just did. not. go. to. Sally's.  




I wonder if there were any family politics involved in that little ironclad policy, of if it was simply a matter of taste.  It's not as though the pizzas that Pepe's and Sally's put out are dramatically different.
 
 
kaszeta
There were exactly three acceptable pizza places in the New Haven area, in a strict order: Pepe's, The Modern (if one was on a schedule, only!) and Bimonte's (if one wanted to not drive as far from my aunt's place in North Haven).  I'm not sure I'm fully forgiven for my last trip to Sally's.
 

 
I'm curious. Where exactly was Bimonte's located?
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/07 10:17:36 (permalink)
Glenn1234
wanderingjew
Glenn1234
 
I can't recall a time I had "discovered" pizza.  It was always around.  My mother made it from scratch, or we went out to a pizza place.  One of the places we went to early on was called, "Two Guys from Italy", located in East Greenwich, RI, which is one town north of my home town.  Today, that place is called, "Frank and John from Italy", and is close to where Dale lives now.  Janet and I met him and friend Mike for dinner there about a year or so ago.  
 
Glenn
 
 




I'm going to take a wild guess and say that was actually closer to 3 years ago.. Time Flies...
Oh and Frank and John's from Italy is also Joe Rogo's home away from home whenever he's passing through Rhode Island.




After thinking about it a bit more, I'm pretty sure it was during the week of my (and Mike's) 30th high school reunion.  That would have been mid or late July of 2014.  So, it is coming up on 3 years in a few months.  Time does fly!   
 
Glenn
 
 




I remembered it was over the summer. and I remember being "heavier" than I am now. I had lost weight starting in late spring 2015 (literally the day I flew home from the Meet n Greet Chicago spring trip) so I knew it had to be before that.
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/07 10:18:27 (permalink)
Ketteract
I wonder if there were any family politics involved in that little ironclad policy, of if it was simply a matter of taste.  It's not as though the pizzas that Pepe's and Sally's put out are dramatically different.

Unsure on this one.  My family is known for having really strong opinions on stuff like this. 
 

I'm curious. Where exactly was Bimonte's located?



Bimonte's Pizza Castle.   Joe Bimonte was, IIRC, Frank Pepe's Son-in-Law.  His place was on Hamden, on Whitney just north of Dixwell.  Decent pizza, but Bimonte died back in 96 or so, and quality dropped after that. That location is now Eli's Brick Oven.  Not bad, but the only real attraction it has it that it's nearby my aunt's place.
 
His son Greg opened up Mr B's Pizza, but I wasn't impressed when I visited.
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/07 10:19:40 (permalink)
wanderingjew
I'm going to take a wild guess and say that was actually closer to 3 years ago.. Time Flies...
Oh and Frank and John's from Italy is also Joe Rogo's home away from home whenever he's passing through Rhode Island.




I rather like Frank and John's.  That was my go-to place when my grandfather was in the nearby nursing home.
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/07 10:55:00 (permalink)
kaszeta
wanderingjew
I'm going to take a wild guess and say that was actually closer to 3 years ago.. Time Flies...
Oh and Frank and John's from Italy is also Joe Rogo's home away from home whenever he's passing through Rhode Island.




I rather like Frank and John's.  That was my go-to place when my grandfather was in the nearby nursing home.




My condo is a short walking distance away
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/07 11:01:00 (permalink)
I think we are all to young to have discovered pizza. Well, maybe Michael Hoffman was around when Joe Rogos Family landed after stepping off the Santa Marinara. As for us younger folks. I grew up with the best Apizza around. Paul's, Rocco's and Jerry's Apizza in Bridgeport, Ct. Apizza was a meal that was loved by all in our household.....Being out in the PNW I miss great Apizza on the East coast.
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/07 11:19:11 (permalink)
MetroplexJim
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...  which went boom, like many other Italian joints as I was growing up.



Yet another reason why my parents never took me to such places.

My older sisters took me there. They took me along on their Happy Days excursions per my mother's rule.
I'd forgotten about school pizza but it was the standard square cut pan pizza. Everyone bought their lunch those days.
Wonderful stuff.
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/07 13:28:24 (permalink)
kaszeta
Ketteract
I wonder if there were any family politics involved in that little ironclad policy, of if it was simply a matter of taste.  It's not as though the pizzas that Pepe's and Sally's put out are dramatically different.

Unsure on this one.  My family is known for having really strong opinions on stuff like this. 
 

I'm curious. Where exactly was Bimonte's located?



Bimonte's Pizza Castle.   Joe Bimonte was, IIRC, Frank Pepe's Son-in-Law.  His place was on Hamden, on Whitney just north of Dixwell.  Decent pizza, but Bimonte died back in 96 or so, and quality dropped after that. That location is now Eli's Brick Oven.  Not bad, but the only real attraction it has it that it's nearby my aunt's place.
 
His son Greg opened up Mr B's Pizza, but I wasn't impressed when I visited.


Would you by any chance happen to be related to someone named Yvonne Fortune? She was part Bimonte and part Consiglio, and even a little bit Pepe.
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/07 14:49:33 (permalink)
Michael Hoffman
Would you by any chance happen to be related to someone named Yvonne Fortune? She was part Bimonte and part Consiglio, and even a little bit Pepe.

Nope, not aware of any Italian heritage.  On that side of the family it's all Lithuanian and Polish.
 
(I should clarify that by "Pepe's Family" that means the family preferred Pepe's.  I've got second cousins in the area that are a "Sally's Family", enough so that they've got line-skipping privileges and would only be caught at Pepe's under special circumstances)
post edited by kaszeta - 2017/03/07 15:47:52
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/07 18:36:31 (permalink)
Foodbme
1955 - St. Marys, PA - Population, around 9000.
 
A couple of brothers built a little shack in the front yard of their farm on the "Million Dollar Highway" just outside of town.  I don't remember the brothers names but they had been to a city somewhere and ate some pizza and decided to bring pizza to the hicks.
 
You drove down a dirt driveway and pulled into the field to get to the counter. Take out only.
We would buy a pizza and drive another mile or 2 down the Million Dollar Highway to the drive in movies.
I've never had pizza that tasted any better than that pizza. PERIOD!

 
That sounds very much like my first slices.  Little concrete block building, window service only.  And, it was near a twin drive-in movie set near Canonsburg water dam.  Then, the area was largely rural - an occasional filling station or bar.
 
Their 'pizza technique' used par-baked pie on a square, shallow baking tin.  When you ordered, they'd add the cheese and toppings and finish them for a few minutes in a Blodgett-style oven.
 

 
The square slices were served on parchment paper and were burn-the-roof-of-your-mouth hot.  As I mentioned above, you can still get pie served that way today at Mario's in Arlington, VA.  Near you, Jim, it looks like DiCarlo's in Litchfield Park looks pretty close.
 
And I agree, no slice even comes close to those first ones!
 
Foodbme
The "Million Dollar Highway" was so named because that's what it cost to build the 25 mile stretch of road between DuBois, PA and St. Marys back in the Depression '30's by the CCC over mountainous terrain. Today, that same road would cost Billions to build.
But I Digress. 



A worthy digression, indeed!
 
The locals here in Dallas (and those in The Valley of the Sun) don't appreciate what it takes to build a highway in Central and Western PA.  They just grade a few bumps, put down crushed stone, and lay down 12 - 16 lanes of concrete: and voila!, an instant arterial.  The construction of Pennsylvania's I-79 and I-80 took decades. 
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/07 19:40:28 (permalink)
kaszeta
Michael Hoffman
Would you by any chance happen to be related to someone named Yvonne Fortune? She was part Bimonte and part Consiglio, and even a little bit Pepe.

Nope, not aware of any Italian heritage.  On that side of the family it's all Lithuanian and Polish.
 
(I should clarify that by "Pepe's Family" that means the family preferred Pepe's.  I've got second cousins in the area that are a "Sally's Family", enough so that they've got line-skipping privileges and would only be caught at Pepe's under special circumstances)


Ah, that clarification explains why you wouldn't be related to Yvonne. For the record, she and I went to school together.
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/07 23:45:37 (permalink)
MetroplexJim
Foodbme
1955 - St. Marys, PA - Population, around 9000.
 
A couple of brothers built a little shack in the front yard of their farm on the "Million Dollar Highway" just outside of town.  I don't remember the brothers names but they had been to a city somewhere and ate some pizza and decided to bring pizza to the hicks.
 
You drove down a dirt driveway and pulled into the field to get to the counter. Take out only.
We would buy a pizza and drive another mile or 2 down the Million Dollar Highway to the drive in movies.
I've never had pizza that tasted any better than that pizza. PERIOD!

 
That sounds very much like my first slices.  Little concrete block building, window service only.  And, it was near a twin drive-in movie set near Canonsburg water dam.  Then, the area was largely rural - an occasional filling station or bar.
 
Their 'pizza technique' used par-baked pie on a square, shallow baking tin.  When you ordered, they'd add the cheese and toppings and finish them for a few minutes in a Blodgett-style oven.
 

 
The square slices were served on parchment paper and were burn-the-roof-of-your-mouth hot.  As I mentioned above, you can still get pie served that way today at Mario's in Arlington, VA.  Near you, Jim, it looks like DiCarlo's in Litchfield Park looks pretty close.
 
And I agree, no slice even comes close to those first ones!
 
Foodbme
The "Million Dollar Highway" was so named because that's what it cost to build the 25 mile stretch of road between DuBois, PA and St. Marys back in the Depression '30's by the CCC over mountainous terrain. Today, that same road would cost Billions to build.
But I Digress. 



A worthy digression, indeed!
The locals here in Dallas (and those in The Valley of the Sun) don't appreciate what it takes to build a highway in Central and Western PA.  They just grade a few bumps, put down crushed stone, and lay down 12 - 16 lanes of concrete: and voila!, an instant arterial.  The construction of Pennsylvania's I-79 and I-80 took decades. 



We lived in Sharon PA and Youngstown for a period of time and would go back & forth to St Marys on I-80. Spent many trips taking detours on and off I-80 since they built it in sections, miles apart from one section to another.
Now it's just one continuous pot hole that The Donald is going to fix! 
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/07 23:45:37 (permalink)
MetroplexJim
Foodbme
1955 - St. Marys, PA - Population, around 9000.
 
A couple of brothers built a little shack in the front yard of their farm on the "Million Dollar Highway" just outside of town.  I don't remember the brothers names but they had been to a city somewhere and ate some pizza and decided to bring pizza to the hicks.
 
You drove down a dirt driveway and pulled into the field to get to the counter. Take out only.
We would buy a pizza and drive another mile or 2 down the Million Dollar Highway to the drive in movies.
I've never had pizza that tasted any better than that pizza. PERIOD!

 
That sounds very much like my first slices.  Little concrete block building, window service only.  And, it was near a twin drive-in movie set near Canonsburg water dam.  Then, the area was largely rural - an occasional filling station or bar.
 
Their 'pizza technique' used par-baked pie on a square, shallow baking tin.  When you ordered, they'd add the cheese and toppings and finish them for a few minutes in a Blodgett-style oven.
 

 
The square slices were served on parchment paper and were burn-the-roof-of-your-mouth hot.  As I mentioned above, you can still get pie served that way today at Mario's in Arlington, VA.  Near you, Jim, it looks like DiCarlo's in Litchfield Park looks pretty close.
 
And I agree, no slice even comes close to those first ones!
 
Foodbme
The "Million Dollar Highway" was so named because that's what it cost to build the 25 mile stretch of road between DuBois, PA and St. Marys back in the Depression '30's by the CCC over mountainous terrain. Today, that same road would cost Billions to build.
But I Digress. 



A worthy digression, indeed!
The locals here in Dallas (and those in The Valley of the Sun) don't appreciate what it takes to build a highway in Central and Western PA.  They just grade a few bumps, put down crushed stone, and lay down 12 - 16 lanes of concrete: and voila!, an instant arterial.  The construction of Pennsylvania's I-79 and I-80 took decades. 



We lived in Sharon PA and Youngstown for a period of time and would go back & forth to St Marys on I-80. Spent many trips taking detours on and off I-80 since they built it in sections, miles apart from one section to another.
Now it's just one continuous pot hole that The Donald is going to fix! 
#52
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/08 04:49:08 (permalink)
Foodbme
MetroplexJim
Foodbme
1955 - St. Marys, PA - Population, around 9000.
 
A couple of brothers built a little shack in the front yard of their farm on the "Million Dollar Highway" just outside of town.  I don't remember the brothers names but they had been to a city somewhere and ate some pizza and decided to bring pizza to the hicks.
 
You drove down a dirt driveway and pulled into the field to get to the counter. Take out only.
We would buy a pizza and drive another mile or 2 down the Million Dollar Highway to the drive in movies.
I've never had pizza that tasted any better than that pizza. PERIOD!

 
That sounds very much like my first slices.  Little concrete block building, window service only.  And, it was near a twin drive-in movie set near Canonsburg water dam.  Then, the area was largely rural - an occasional filling station or bar.
 
Their 'pizza technique' used par-baked pie on a square, shallow baking tin.  When you ordered, they'd add the cheese and toppings and finish them for a few minutes in a Blodgett-style oven.
 

 
The square slices were served on parchment paper and were burn-the-roof-of-your-mouth hot.  As I mentioned above, you can still get pie served that way today at Mario's in Arlington, VA.  Near you, Jim, it looks like DiCarlo's in Litchfield Park looks pretty close.
 
And I agree, no slice even comes close to those first ones!
 
Foodbme
The "Million Dollar Highway" was so named because that's what it cost to build the 25 mile stretch of road between DuBois, PA and St. Marys back in the Depression '30's by the CCC over mountainous terrain. Today, that same road would cost Billions to build.
But I Digress. 



A worthy digression, indeed!
The locals here in Dallas (and those in The Valley of the Sun) don't appreciate what it takes to build a highway in Central and Western PA.  They just grade a few bumps, put down crushed stone, and lay down 12 - 16 lanes of concrete: and voila!, an instant arterial.  The construction of Pennsylvania's I-79 and I-80 took decades. 



We lived in Sharon PA and Youngstown for a period of time and would go back & forth to St Marys on I-80. Spent many trips taking detours on and off I-80 since they built it in sections, miles apart from one section to another.
Now it's just one continuous pot hole that The Donald is going to fix! 


A duck will fix it?????
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/08 09:42:15 (permalink)
Foodbme
We lived in Sharon PA and Youngstown for a period of time and would go back & forth to St Marys on I-80. Spent many trips taking detours on and off I-80 since they built it in sections, miles apart from one section to another.
Now it's just one continuous pot hole that The Donald is going to fix! 



In 1962 my family moved from Washington, PA to New Wilmington, PA.  Most every weekend we visited my grandparents in Eighty-Four, a 90 mile trek that took 3 hours - mostly on Rt. 18.  Like I-80, I-79 was built in bits and pieces and it took some time for enough of it to be done to merit our taking it and detours onto Rt. 19.  By the time the whole rig was finished I had graduated high school, graduated college, and was going to grad school in Charlottesville, VA.  And by then my grandparents had moved to New Wilmington!
 
We never did get to use a completed I-80, but we did venture out to the Emlenton Bridge 'just to see it' and we did use the completed section between West Middlesex and Mercer to race cars in college.
 
And do I ever remember those Pennsylvania potholes!  Freezing cycles and salt means that they will forever be part of the PA moonscape, regardless of who is President.  The (non-duck) Donald might improve tings, but only global warming can solve that problem.
#54
rumaki
Double Chili Cheeseburger
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/08 16:45:34 (permalink)
I grew up in Indianapolis in the late 50s/early 60s. My first pizza experience was carryout from Chicken Delight.
My parents always ordered a 'Round the World with no anchovies.  The toppings weren't bad. The crust was like cardboard and execrable. The pizza actually improved on re-heating. Somewhat.
 
Some years later, a small Mom & Pop operation opened up not too far from our house, called Meo's.  That was my first encounter with thin homemade crust, homemade Italian sausage, fresh mushrooms, real mozzarella, and fennel seed on top of the pizza. A revelation!  
 
And then I went to college at Northwestern, and that was the beginning of my love affair with Chicago-style pizza. 
 
 
 
#55
chicagostyledog
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/08 21:30:28 (permalink)
In 1950, my dad graduated from pharmacy school and purchased Castellano Pharmacy from Tony Castellano on the west side of Chicago. The entire neighborhood was Italian immigrants(business and residential). My dad's drug store was located on the corner of Kedzie and Harrison. On the Kedzie side was Joe the Barber (neighborhood bookie) and Fontino the butcher. On the Harrison side was was Mary Fosco's Tavern, Joe Izzo the undertaker, and an unnamed pizza parlor(where I experienced my first pizza). Unfortunately, some time in the mid 50's the pizza parlor what shut down by the cops who caught the owners smuggling drugs out in their pizzas (true story).
 
CSD
#56
RodBangkok
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/09 06:51:46 (permalink)
Farm kid from way out in the country N. Illinois...on a 4h trip to Chicago, my first trip their also...year 1962 or there abouts.   Went to the international livestock show at the Intl amphitheater next to the stockyards, ate in a restaurant for the first time by the stockyards and had one hell of a steak, then the 4h leader who knew chicago took us to a pizza joint somewhere downtown, have no idea where, it was downhill from there for many years to find any pizza that compared!
#57
cavandre
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/09 09:55:12 (permalink)
Grew up in the NYC area so I don't remember a time without pizza.
#58
ann peeples
Porterhouse
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Re: Your First Time -- how you "discovered" pizza 2017/03/09 11:38:52 (permalink)
I didnt discover pizza. It discovered me, as my parents provided all my food.
#59
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